Carnegie Institution of Washington Publication, Issue 221

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Carnegie Institution of Washington, 1915
 

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Page 9 - As similar lesions were usually present in the non-pregnant tube, he held that they afforded a satisfactory explanation for the arrest of the ovum. He assumed that some of the canals inclosed between the adherent folds communicated freely with the main lumen of the tube, but ended blindly at the other extremity, so that if a fertilized ovum were arrested in such a culdesac a tubal pregnancy might develop.
Page 69 - The patient was very anemic, and suffered great pain. In the abdomen there was a large quantity of blood which had escaped at different times, shown by the varying degrees of consistency; some clots were recent, bleeding continuing from the tube; while some were very firm and yellowish-red, the latter being on the floor of the pelvis. The bleeding for such length of time without completion of the abortion is the main interesting feature. DR.
Page 9 - After it had been demonstrated that the arrest of the ovum was not due to the destruction of the cilia by the inflammatory process, great difficulty was experienced in explaining the connection between the two conditions. In 1902 Opitz found definite histological inflammatory lesions in two-thirds of his specimens...
Page 49 - ... across. This venerable cross leans slightly on one side, and its rude fashioning presents a great contrast to the care displayed in the shaping of the Windypost. On the south-east face there is something which bears a faint resemblance to an incised cross, but the granite is so much worn by the weather that it is impossible to determine with any degree of certainty whether the marks are artificial or not. It will be noticed that the cross stands within a circular enclosure formed by a low bank...
Page 69 - ... color as that of the surrounding mother's blood. It appears as if the syncytium, in destroying the mesoderm of the chorion and the mother's blood, at the same time made it possible for the blood of the embryo to take up the blood pigment thus liberated. At any rate, the blood of a human embryo three weeks old contains no pigment and the sections of this specimen permit of this interpretation. There is also a considerable quantity of mother's blood within the ovum around the embryo, but as the...
Page 69 - The whole chorion is imbedded in a large mass of mother's blood. The most remarkable part of this specimen is found within the blood-vessels of the chorion. They are gorged with nucleated blood corpuscles filled with a pigment of the same color as that of the surrounding mother's blood. It appears as if the syncytium, in destroying the mesoderm of the chorion and the mother's blood, at the same time made it possible for the blood of the embryo to take up the blood pigment thus liberated. At any rate,...
Page 69 - PREGNANCY, in which the fetus of two months was found still within the tube. The great interest in this case lies in the fact that operation was performed as the process of tubal abortion was taking place. The abdominal extremity of the tube is dilated to a diameter of 1 centimetre.
Page 7 - The pathological specimens, however, show a similar nature and degree of degeneration as in specimens obtained from the uterus. A number of small specimens which were cut into serial sections contained no embryos at all; they are included among the 39 mentioned above. From my experience in searching for embryos in pathological ova I am of the opinion that a few more pathological embryos would have been found had the specimens been examined with greater care. It is unlikely...
Page 72 - The smaller vesicle is about a millimeter in diameter, is lined with cylindrical cells, and is covered with quite an even layer of mesoderm, in which there are some quite large blood-vessels, but no blood. Towards one of its ends it is covered with a marked layer of cylindrical cells. It may be that this second vesicle represents what is left of the embryo. Around these two vesicles, filling the whole ccelom, there is a dense reticular magma.
Page 54 - Read in the otherway this would mean that if the inflammatory condition is nearly healed, the ovum implants itself in the tube and grows normally, but if the results of infection are still pronounced, the ovum rapidly disintegrates. Such an inflammatory process is signalized not only by an inflammatory reaction in the tube wall, but also by very pronounced changes within the tube lumen, the most common of these being a condition known as follicular salpingitis (Opitz).

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