Carnegie Institution of Washington Publication, Issue 211

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Carnegie Institution of Washington, 1915 - Science
 

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Page 89 - ... offered by the Brodhun sector. The animal's reactions were taken in the apparatus shown in figure 9, which consists of a large box, 94.5 cm. in length by 74 cm. in width by 25 cm. in depth. It is divided into a home compartment H, 31.5 cm. in length by 25 cm. in width, and a response chamber C, 30.5 cm. in width, which is partially separated into two smaller compartments by a partition. The length of the partition is 25.5 cm. The distance from the door leading into the response chamber to the...
Page 29 - ... weeks for the round trip of 22,000 miles. Not less than 150 miles in a straight line must be their daily task, and this is undoubtedly multiplied several times by their zigzag twistings and turnings in pursuit of food. The arctic tern has more hours of daylight and sunlight than any other animal on the globe. At the most northern nesting site the midnight sun has already appeared before the birds' arrival, and it never sets during their entire stay at the breeding grounds.
Page 126 - In the first place we must assume in the animal an adjustment or determination of the psycho-physical mechanism toward a certain end. The animal desires, as we like to say, to get out and to reach the food. Whatever be his consciousness, his behavior shows that he is, as an organism, set in that direction. This adjustment persists till the motor reaction is consummated ; it is the driving force in the unremitting efforts of the animal to attain the desired end.
Page 30 - They are distributed by being put aboard small vessels trading among the islands. The birds are liberated whenever there Is news to be carried, returning to their perches sometimes In an hour or less from islands Just below the horizon and out of sight of the home base. Generally they are in no great hurry. As the food of the frigate bird may be picked up almost anywhere at sea, there is no means of ascertaining how much time the bird loses In feeding or trying to feed en route. It may also linger...
Page 33 - whether right side, left side, bow or stern, Tom was always on the part of the boat nearest home, and straining as far as he could in that direction. Fully a mile from any shore, how could he tell which shore was which...
Page 126 - ... place we must assume in the animal an adjustment or determination of the psycho-physical mechanism toward a certain end. The animal desires, as we like to say, to get out and to reach the food. Whatever be his consciousness, his behavior shows that he is, as an organism, set in that direction. This adjustment persists till the motor reaction is consummated; it is the driving force in the unremitting efforts of the animal to attain the desired end. His reactions are, therefore, the joint result...
Page 30 - Before six o'clock of the same day the bird was back on its own perch at Nanomaga, accompanied by two of the Nuitao birds, which, not being at their perch on that island when it was liberated, it had evidently picked up en route. Sixty miles in...
Page 35 - Mexico for the purpose of returning to one of their breeding places on one of the Tortugas called "Noddy Key." They nearly equal in number the sooty terns, which also breed on an island a few miles distant.
Page 35 - On landing I felt for a moment as If the birds would raise me from the ground, so thick were they all around and so quick the motion of their wings. Their cries were Indeed deafening, yet not more than half of them took to wing on our arrival, those which rose being chiefly male birds, as we afterwards ascertained. We ran across the naked beach, and as we entered the thick cover before us, and spread In different directions, we might at every step have caught a sitting bird, or...
Page 35 - ... and so quick the motion of their wings. Their cries were indeed deafening, yet not more than half of them took to wing on our arrival, those which rose being chiefly male birds, as we afterwards ascertained. We ran across the naked beach, and as we entered the thick cover before us, and spread in different directions, we might at every step have caught a sitting bird, or one scrambling through the bushes to escape from us. Some of the sailors, who had more than once been there before, had provided...

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