Carnival, Canboulay and Calypso: Traditions in the Making

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Cambridge University Press, Feb 4, 1999 - Music - 293 pages
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Starting from the days of slavery and following through to the first decades of the twentieth century, this book traces the evolution of Carnival and secular black music in Trinidad and beyond. Calypso emerged as the preeminent Carnival song form at the end of the nineteenth century and its association with the festival is investigated, as are the first commercial recordings by Trinidad performers. Considerable use is made of contemporary newspaper reports, colonial documents, travelogues, oral history and folklore, providing an authoritative treatment of a fascinating story in popular cultural history.
 

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Contents

Background to West Indian music
1
Pain nous ka mangé music carnival and events 17831869
11
Not A Cent To Buy Rice poverty revelry and riots 18701896
67
Iron Duke In The Land banners bands and music 18971920
134
Creole musical traditions Africa the Caribbean and beyond
228
Notes
237
Bibliography
257
Discography
273
Index
274
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