Carpe Diem: A Student Guide to Active Learning

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University Press of America, 1996 - Education - 241 pages
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Carpe Diem was written to transform student attitudes about their studies from those of "hourly workers" sitting in lectures and dutifully taking notes to an attitude which reflects student ownership of their education. The motivation for this book comes from compelling evidence that being an active rather than a passive learner will make a significant difference in life's successes. This book emphasizes that acquiring factual information is critically important, but knowing facts is not enough. Successful people must also acquire broad skills including writing, speaking, interpersonal skills, initiative, time management, assertiveness and reasoning ability. The specific teaching and learning techniques discussed include the discussion method, computer assisted instruction, laboratory instruction, simulation, the case method, intensive reading and writing, student journals, and cooperative learning including student affairs activities. Carpe Diem also provides the rationale for these learning techiques. In addition, it helps students develop a personal plan and connects that plan with active learning outcomes. Finally, the book offers appendices on the relevance of specific general education subjects and on how to choose a college that supports active learning.
 

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Contents

This Book is About Active Learning
1
Introduction
3
Higher Education Today
4
Facts Are Important
5
Active Learning is Essential to Your Success in Life
6
Initiative is the Key to Active Learning
8
Assignment
9
Recommended Reading
10
The Seven Principles
120
What You Should Expect from Your University
121
What Your Professors Should Expect of You
122
Assignment
135
Advanced Active Learning Applications Reading and Writing
139
Introduction
140
Reading
141
Depth and Surface Processing
142

A Lecture and Nothing More A FirstClass Ticket
11
Introduction
12
Passive Learning Characteristics
13
Passive Learning and Facts
15
Passive Disaster
17
Why Are There Still Some Passive Teachers and Passive Learners?
18
Taking the Initiative
24
Assignment
26
Active Learning A ThirdClass Ticket
29
Introduction
30
Characteristics of Active Learning
31
Whats In It For You?
38
Paces Research
40
Other Research
46
What Does It Cost?
47
References
49
A Personalized Education Developing Your Road Map
51
Introduction
52
A Personal Plan
53
The Major Theme
54
Refining Your Draft Plan
57
The Completed Plan
60
Assignment
61
Tailoring Your College Years to Your Personal Plan
63
Introduction
64
The Major Theme
65
Traits Important to Accomplish Michelles Goals
67
Observations on Identifying Your Own Traits
69
Some Suggested Traits to Consider
70
A Brief Comment on the Importance of a Broad Education
74
More Traits Important to Career Success
75
Noncareer Traits
79
Additional Traits to Consider That Are Applicable to Noncareer Aspects of Life
80
Identifying the Traits You Most Want to Emphasize
81
Sample Advice
82
Finishing Your List of Traits
84
Assignment
85
Helping You Help Yourself Time Management Your Advisor and General Education
87
Introduction
89
Academic Advising
95
Expectations You Should Have of Your Advisor
99
Expectations Your Advisor Should Have of You
101
Support Programs to Enhance Advising
103
General Education
104
The Relevance of General Education
108
Maintaining Your Interest
111
Assignment
112
Active Learning Applications The Basic Ways to Develop Desired Traits
115
Introduction
116
The TeachingLearning Partnership
117
Developing Depth Reading
144
Writing
146
Writing is a Campuswide Activity
147
Terminology Used in Writing Assignments
148
Portfolios
151
Some Conclusions About Writing
152
Assignment
153
Advanced Active Learning Applications Discussion and Case Methods Collaborative Learning Simulation Laboratory Instruction and Computer Assis...
155
The Importance of Variety
156
Kolbs Research
157
Your Responsibility
158
Lecture Combined with Discussion and the Case Method
159
Steps in Effective Discussion
160
Collaborative Learning
168
Why Collaborative Learning is Important
169
Steps for Effective Collaborative Learning
171
Form Your Own Study Team
173
Simulation
174
The Laboratory
176
Computerassisted Instruction
179
Benefits of CAI
181
Assignment
183
Experiential Learning OutofClass Activities
187
Introduction
189
A Special Recommendation for Liberal Arts Majors
190
Supervision of Internships
191
Cocurricular Activities
192
Supervision of Campus Activities
193
Have a Good Time
195
Selecting Campus Activities
196
Involvement for the Commuting Student
197
A Conclusion
198
Postscript
201
Your Constant Companion
202
The Relevance of Specific General Education Courses
205
FOREIGN LANGUAGE
206
SCIENCE
208
HISTORY
211
ENGLISH
214
THE ARTS
217
MATHEMATICS
220
PHILOSOPHY
224
ECONOMICS
227
POLITICAL SCIENCE
230
PSYCHOLOGY
233
Selecting a Studentcentered College or University
237
Things to Do
238
Things to Ask
239
Copyright

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About the author (1996)

Russell G. Warren is Executive Vice President and Provost at Mercer University.

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