Cartographic Encounters: Perspectives on Native American Mapmaking and Map Use

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G. Malcolm Lewis
University of Chicago Press, Sep 15, 1998 - History - 318 pages
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Ever since a Native American prepared a paper "charte" of the lower Colorado River for the Spaniard Hernando de Alarcón in 1540, Native Americans have been making maps in the course of encounters with whites. This book charts the history of these cartographic encounters, examining native maps and mapmaking from the pre- and post-contact periods.

G. Malcolm Lewis provides accessible and detailed overviews of the history of native North American maps, mapmaking, and scholarly interest in these topics. Other contributions include a study of colonial Aztec cartography that highlights the connections among maps, space, and history; an account of the importance of native maps as archaeological evidence; and an interpretation of an early-contact-period hide painting of an actual encounter involving whites and two groups of warring natives.

Although few original native maps have survived, contemporary copies and accounts of mapmaking form a rich resource for anyone interested in the history of Native American encounters or the history of cartography and geography.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Chapter
9
Chapter
33
Chapter Three
55
The Ongoing Second Encounter Recent and Current Encounters
71
Chapter Five
111
Chapter
135
Chapter Seven
157
Chapter Eight
187
Chapter Nine
205
Chapter
223
CHAPTER TWELVE
273
Index
287
Copyright

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