Case

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Cambridge University Press, Sep 20, 2001 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 227 pages
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Case is an accessible introduction for students of linguistics to the ways relations between words in sentences are marked in languages. Case is fundamental to the whole system of language. One of its most interesting features is the recurrence of apparently idiosyncratic patterns and devices in otherwise unrelated languages. This book picks out these recurring strategies and explores their significance. It provides the background against which the case-marking of particular languages can be best understood. In this revised 2001 edition, Blake refines and expands on his discussions of the most important concepts in the study of case, taking into account recent developments in the field. It incorporates significant additions to the data and includes a thoroughly revised section on abstract case in the Chomskyan paradigm.
 

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Contents

Overview
1
12 Other manifestations
7
13 Competing mechanisms
12
Problems in describing case systems
18
22 Distinguishing cases
19
23 Meanings and functions
29
Modern approaches to case
47
32 Grammatical relations
48
54 Genitive
149
55 Partitive
151
57 Other cases
154
58 Inflectional case hierarchy
155
Life cycle of case systems
161
62 Developments within case systems
167
63 Loss of case marking
175
64 Derived functions of case marking
180

33 Abstract case
57
34 Semantic roles and grammatical relations
62
35 Hierarchies
86
Distribution of case marking
93
43 Within the noun phrase
96
44 Within the word
104
45 Within the subordinate clause
109
Survey of case marking
118
53 Dative
142
65 Finale
183
Notes
184
Guide to terminology
195
Guide to further reading
207
References
208
Author index
219
Language index
222
Subject index
225
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