Case Studies in Constructivist Leadership and Teaching

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Scarecrow Press, 2003 - Education - 365 pages
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These 27 real-life, down-to-earth case studies offer the tools and techniques to help educators improve their personal and professional practices as teachers, supervisors, and administrators in our ever-increasingly complex and changing schools and school districts. They contain strategies developed over the years that considerably improved the achievement and satisfaction of students. The cases range over a wide assortment of settings, from rural to inner city to suburban. The constructivist processes used are described carefully and the strategies are laid out clearly so practitioners can adopt them gradually and safely. Included is a checklist in the fifth case study which presents in detail a model to guide practice. Topics covered include running a basketball team and cheerleading squad, teaching mechanical drawing in an inner city school (but lacking experience with the subject), and four invited cases that present a typical day-in-the-life of a constructivist principal, a department chair, a teacher in a charter school, and a middle school teacher who became contructivist."
 

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Contents

Passing Through The Confessions of an Alienated Student The Case of Sue SharpOr How I Ran a Diner and Still Graduated High School
3
The Constructivist Teacher When a Substitute Teaches Your Class and Hasnt a Clue
11
Creative Classroom Management Better Involve the TroopsOr How I Managed to Teach Mechanical Drawing without Knowing Anything about It
17
Crocodile Rock Gateway to Emancipation and Empowerment
25
How I Created a Supportive Culture in a Constructivist Classroom or Team How to Pull It Off and Make It Work for You
31
Constructivist Leaders Mental Checklist
41
My Development as a Constructivist Teacher
49
Leprechauns in the Classroom
59
Looking Up the Wrong End of the Horse Our Testing ManiaViewpoints of Politicians and Practitioners and Maybe Kids A Cheap Fast Way to Weak...
185
How to Make Your School and Your Classroom Work BetterDecentralize into a Constructivist Approach
197
A Day in the Life of a Contructivist Principal
209
Moving Orange Blossom Trail Elementary School toward Constructivism
223
Outside the Box Three Team Leaders as CoPrincipals
245
Our Evaluation Ritual Trap And How to Spring It
255
The Rigid New Principal and the Constructivist Teacher Studies in Tension
269
Where Are the Students on Your School Board? A Case Study of an Alternative Schools Student Board of Education
279

Classroom ManagementSolved
65
Looking at the Right End of the Horse What We Found in Swedish Schools Amazed Us IDEALIZED Constructivism
73
Practicing Constructivism in a Public ESE Charter Middle SchoolWith Difficulty
81
From the Mouths of StudentsInteractions with Constructivism
89
A Typical Day as a Constructivist High School Teacher and Department Chair
113
ESOL Constructivism and YouConstructivist and ESOL Philosophy and Practice Another Surprise
125
Freedom versus ControlThe Scripted Classroom The High Cost of Control to Everyone Including Teachers
149
A Constructivist Sports Program The Case of Principal Marc Douglass Unusual Basketball Team
157
Beliefs Myths and Realities A Case Study of a Rogue Junior High Transformation into a Model Middle School
167
Designing Our Structures to Do Our Heavy Work What a Curriculum Structure Can Do to Make Our Professional Lives a Lot Easier
287
Two Curriculum Committee Structure Models and Suggested Rules for Operation
298
Developing and Running a Pupil Personnel Services Council Making Our Structures Work for Us
305
National StandardsThe Good the Bad the Ugly
313
The Latest Research about Constructivism Part I Different Approaches to ConstructivismWhat Its All About
327
The Latest Research about Constructivism Part II On Instruction and Leadership
345
About the Author
365
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About the author (2003)

Arthur Shapiro is professor of Educational Leadership and Higher Education at the University of South Florida in Tampa. He has worked as a teacher, principal, director of secondary education, assistant superintendent, and superintendent in inner city, rural, and suburban settings.

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