Case of Peter Finnerty, Including a Full Report of All Proceedings which Took Place in the Court of King's Bench Upon the Subject, and of which But an Imperfect Sketch Has Appeared in the Newspapers, with Notes and a Preface: Comprehending an Essay Upon the Law of Libel, and Some Remarks Upon Mr. Finnerty's Case, to which is Annexed, an Abstract of the Case of Colonel Draper, Upon which Precedent Mr. Finnerty Professed to Act

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J. M'Creery, 1811 - Libel and slander - 72 pages
 

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Page 6 - our said Lord the King, assigned to keep the Peace in the County aforesaid, and also to hear and determine divers Felonies, Trespasses, and other Misdemeanours committed in the same County, by the Oath of Twelve Jurors,* good and lawful Men of the County
Page 35 - The trial by rack is utterly unknown to the law of England; though once, when the dukes of Exeter and Suffolk, and other ministers of Henry VI. had laid a design to introduce the civil law into this kingdom as the rule of government, fora beginning thereof, they erected a
Page 35 - beginning thereof, they erected a rack for torture; which was called in derision the duke of Exeter's daughter, and still remains in the tower of London; where it was occasionally used as an engine of state, not of law, more than once in
Page iv - those who are intrusted with the administration of public affairs, which doth not only endanger the public peace, as all other libels do, by stirring up the parties immediately concerned in it to acts of revenge, but also have a direct tendency to breed in the people a dislike of their governors, and incline them to faction and sedition.
Page 6 - by the Oath of Twelve Jurors,* good and lawful Men of the County aforesaid, now here sworn and charged to inquire for our said Lord the King for the Body of the same County. It is presented
Page 13 - In contempt of our said lord, the King, and his laws, to the evil example of all others, and against the peace of our said
Page iv - in themselves, yet if published in writing, and tending in any degree to the discredit of a man, are libellous, whether such words defame private persons only, or persons employed in a public capacity; in which latter case they are said to receive an aggravation, as they tend to scandalize the government, by reflecting
Page 53 - nothing of our situation. When torture was the daily and ordinary system of the executive government, it was denied in London with a profligacy of effrontery equal to the barbarity with which it was exhibited in Dublin ; and if the facts that shall appear
Page 35 - recollecting that they were men, reproved the Romans for such want of humanity. If there were but one nation in the world which had abolished the use of torture, if in that nation crimes were no more frequent than in others ; and if that nation be more enlightened and more
Page 17 - to protect the personal safety of the subject against arbitrary and excessive bail, and against the stretching of the power of attachment beyond the limits of the constitution; and we will, as far as in us lies, prevent any renewal of the Police Act. (Signed)

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