Caspar Friedrich

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Harry N. Abrams, Apr 1, 1995 - Art - 128 pages
The art of Caspar David Friedrich (1774-1840) holds a special fascination. A unique figure in the age of Romanticism, Friedrich was as significant within the art of Germany as Eugene Delacroix was in France, or J. M. W. Turner in England. Yet his work was little known in its time, and after the artist's death it was long forgotten. Only in the twentieth century did it become apparent that Eugene Delacroix anticipated much of our modern experience of the world. Friedrich painted strange, evocative scenes whose dark tones and ambiguous meanings seem to embody the very notion of the German Romantic visionary, yet at the same time they seem to look ahead to various modern styles. Scholars have pointed out the similarity between his paintings and the symbolic seascapes of Edvard Munch, and his atmospheric landscapes have an affinity with the work of the Impressionists, yet his use of isolated figures in a limitless expanse of space, dominated by an overwhelming sky, also evokes the sensibility of the Expressionists. Others have related his work to the intimacy of Paul Klee or the lyrical landscapes of Emil Nolde. And there is a fundamental connection between Friedrich's Romanticism and a current of abstract art in our century, allowing him to be compared with painters such as Mark Rothko.

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User Review  - Big_Bang_Gorilla - LibraryThing

Being a good introduction to the German Romantic painter. There is plenty of biographical text, followed by reproductions of his paintings with extensive criticism on the facing page. The illustrations are not particularly large and seem to be slightly washed-out. Read full review

Contents

Preface
6
Caspar David Friedrich by Wieland Schmied
7
Biographical Sketch
43
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

Wieland Schmied is an art critic and essayist. He was director of the Kestner Gesellschaft in Hanover, where he organized the first big Hundertwasser retrospective in 1964, with an accompanying catalogue raisonne. From 1974 to 1975 he was chief curator at the Berliner Nationalgalerie, from 1978 to 1986 the director of the German Artist Exchange Program (DAAD), Berlin and afterwards director of the Munich Academy of Fine Arts. He is currently president of the Bavarian Academy of Fine Arts, Munich.

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