Catalogue of Arabic Glass Weights in the British Museum

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order of the trustees [of the British Museum], 1891 - Glass weights - 127 pages
 

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Page 127 - TABLE OF THE RELATIVE WEIGHTS OF ENGLISH GRAINS and FRENCH GRAMMES. Grains. Grammes. Grains Grammes. Grains. Grammes. Grains. Grammes. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17...
Page 126 - Grammes. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35...
Page xv - These fuloos are of varying eize and weight, but the proportion of copper in kharroobehs to the dirhem at the given time is of course known, and the merchant would proceed to weigh the required number of fuloos by his standard glass weight of so many kharroobehs.
Page xv - ... that these glass standards were used by the merchant to test the weight in copper of a certain number of fuloos, when offered for goods. This theory would account for the numerous varieties of weight employed, as indicated by the figures 9, 14, 15, 20, 25, 27, 30, 32, 33, kharroobehs or keerats.
Page vii - Academy," 5 Feb. 1876, p. 196), who translates the Arabic of Mokaddasi as follows : — " The weights for money (sandj, from the Persian sen*/ =stone) are made of glass, and bear the same stamp as the ordinary pounds, viz. the name of the prince of the faithful." He adds that Prof. Karabecet of Vienna " had come already to the conclusion that the so-called glass coins were in reality weights, and that he held the testimony of Mokaddasi to be decisive.

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