Catalogue of the Special Exhibition of Works of Art of the MediŠval, Renaissance, and More Recent Periods: On Loan at the South Kensington Museum, June 1862. Ed. by J. C. Robinson

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G. E. Eyre and W. Spottiswoode, 1863 - Art - 766 pages
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Page 209 - EPITAPH. ON THE COUNTESS OF PEMBROKE. UNDERNEATH this sable hearse Lies the subject of all verse, Sidney's sister, Pembroke's mother : Death, ere thou hast slain another, Fair, and learned, and good as she, Time shall throw a dart at thee.
Page 451 - Timbs, of early sixteenth century work, was silver-gilt, decorated with fret-work and female busts ; the feet, flasks ; and on the cover is the popular legend of an unicorn yielding its horn to a maiden. The whole is enamelled with coats of arms, and these lines — " To elect the Master of the Mercerie hither am I sent, And by Sir Thomas Leigh for the same intent.
Page 196 - I have been bullied by an usurper ; I have been neglected by a court ; but I will not be dictated to by a subject : your man shan't stand. " ANNE Dorset, Pembroke and Montgomery.
Page 356 - Henry VIII. at the field of the Cloth of Gold, in 1520.
Page 388 - Allah is the Light of the heavens and the earth. The similitude of His light is as a niche wherein is a lamp. The lamp is in a glass. The glass is as it were a shining star.
Page 216 - Felton, and his consort. The monument is of iron. At the feet of the recumbent effigies of the deceased is Fame blowing a trumpet. At the front corners of the sarcophagus are Neptune and Mars, at those at the back two mourning females, all in a sitting posture. At the...
Page 117 - Puritans, seems to have caused the sport to be abandoned in this country, and it is only within the last few years that they have been again employed.
Page 273 - ... rises another battlemented projection or gallery, supporting a small gable-ended structure, in front of which have been statuettes of angels, only one of which, holding a musical instrument, remains. The curve of the crozier is richly crocketed, and has on both sides a series of translucent enamels representing angels playing on various musical instruments. A portion of the work within the curve of the crozier has been lost ; a kneeling statuette of the Bishop remains, as if praying before a...
Page 69 - an enamel " is restricted to metal-work so ornamented, the one requisite being that the vitreous decoration shall have been fixed in its place by fusion. Enamel is, in fact, glass composed of metallic oxides to which certain...
Page 279 - King James I., and celebrated in his time. Fuller, in his " Worthies," says of him that " he was better pleased with presents than money, loved what was pretty rather than what was costly, and preferred rarities before riches.

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