Catastrophic medical expenses: patterns in the non-elderly, non-poor population

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Congress of the United States, Congressional Budget Office, 1982 - Business & Economics - 108 pages
 

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Page 23 - The remainder of this chapter is divided into three sections. The first section reviews many of the rehabilitative devices available, emphasizing the conventional hearing aid.
Page 12 - ... high-cost families tend to be concentrated in one family member, and this concentration becomes more pronounced when higher thresholds are used. In nearly three-fourths of families with expenses over $20,000, 95 percent or more of family medical expenses are attributable to one family member. • The proportion of expenses attributable to inpatient charges is in general large among high-cost families and increases when higher thresholds are used. Plan of the Chapter This chapter begins with a...
Page 12 - The major findings of this chapter are the following: o In the non-elderly, non-poor population, families exceeding the four catastrophic thresholds analyzed ($3,000, $5,000, $10,000, and $20,000) in any one year are relatively rare, but they account for a sizable proportion of total medical expenses. For example, about 5 percent of all families exceed $5,000 in expenses, but they account for about half of total expenses. (As explained...
Page 37 - United States Population Projections for OASDHI Cost Estimates (Actuarial Study No.
Page 12 - ... however, the proportion of families who exceed a catastrophic threshold at least once during a several-year period is far larger.) • The expenses of these high-cost families tend to be concentrated in one family member, and this concentration becomes more pronounced when higher thresholds are used. In nearly three-fourths of families with expenses over $20,000, 95 percent or more of family medical expenses are attributable to one family member. • The proportion of expenses attributable to...
Page 16 - Most high-cost families include one, and only one, individual whose expenses taken alone exceed the threshold. This pattern is also more pronounced when higher thresholds are used. The Proportion of Expenses Attributable to a Single Family Member Family medical expenses are typically concentrated in an individual family member, and this concentration is more pronounced among families with high annual expenses. For example, in about three-fourths of all families filing claims, one individual accounts...
Page 16 - To what extent are large family medical expenses attributable to a single family member? This question has important implications for plans to insure families against the expense of catastrophic illness, because eligibility for reimbursement could be based on either individuals' or families
Page 16 - Proportion of Expenses Attributable to a Single Family Member Family medical expenses are typically concentrated in an individual family member, and this concentration is more pronounced among families with high annual expenses. For example, in about three-fourths of all families filing claims, one individual accounts for at least 75 percent of claimed expenses, and in more than half of all families filing claims, one individual accounts for 95 percent or more of the family's total (see Table 2)....
Page 17 - The Number of High-Cost Individuals in High-Cost Families Another way of looking at the role of individuals in highcost illness is to calculate the number of high-cost Individuals (that is, individuals exceeding catastrophic thresholds) within high-cost families. This can be done by separating the families that exceed a given threshold into categories: those in which no single family member alone exceeds the threshold, those in which These percentages include single-person families, in which all...
Page 18 - A sizable portion of high-cost families (from 15 to 21 percent, depending on the threshold), have no single family member whose expenses taken alone exceed the relevant threshold (see Table 3). These are the families that would be classified as high-cost cases under a family threshold, but not if the same dollar threshold was applied to the expenses of individuals.

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