Catholic Identity: Balancing Reason, Faith, and Power

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Cambridge University Press, Aug 13, 1999 - Religion - 289 pages
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It has been well documented that American Catholics tend to be Catholics on their own terms, or choose to remain Catholic while selectively embracing official Church doctrine. But why do Catholics who disagree with official Church teachings on major issues such as homosexuality, women's ordination, or abortion, and are thus institutionally marginalized, choose to remain Catholic? Why do they stay, when the cost of staying and being stigmatized would seem to be greater than the benefits they might gain from switching to religious groups whose doctrines would validate their beliefs on these issues? Michele Dillon, drawing upon in-depth interviews with Catholics who are openly gay or lesbian, advocates of women's ordination, and pro-choice, investigates why and how pro-change Catholics continue to remain actively involved with the Church, despite their rejection of the Vatican's teaching on sexuality and gender.
 

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Catholic identity: balancing reason, faith, and power

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Focusing on the issue of Catholic identity and contemporary social questions about emancipation from undemocratic structures and tradition, Dillon (sociology, Yale Univ.) studies Catholics who propose ... Read full review

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nice book

Contents

Doctrinal Change in the Catholic Church
34
Official Church Teaching on Homosexuality
54
Dignity
77
Owning the Identity
115
Using Doctrine to Critique Doctrine
164
Pluralism in Community
194
Legitimating Emancipatory Possibilities
221
Catholic Options
242
Research Methodology
257
Index
285
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