Catholic Schools and the Common Good

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Harvard University Press, 1993 - Education - 416 pages
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The authors examine a broad range of Catholic high schools to determine whether or not students are better educated in these schools than they are in public schools. They find that the Catholic schools do have an independent effect on achievement, especially in reducing disparities between disadvantaged and privileged students. The Catholic school of today, they show, is informed by a vision, similar to that of John Dewey, of the school as a community committed to democratic education and the common good of all students.

 

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Contents

The Tradition of Catholic Schools
15
Research Past and Present
55
Classroom Life
81
Curriculum and Academic Organization
101
Communal Organization
126
Governance
148
The Transition to High School
169
Variations in Internal Operations
187
The Impact of Academic Organization
245
The Impact of Communal Organization
272
Catholic Lessons for Americas Schools
297
The Future of Catholic High Schools
329
Notes
345
References
383
Index
395
Copyright

SingleSex versus Coeducational Schools
225

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Page 383 - SOURCE: National Catholic Educational Association, A Statistical Report on Catholic Elementary and Secondary Schools for the Years 1967-68 to 1969-70...

References to this book

Social Capital
David Halpern
Limited preview - 2005
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About the author (1993)

He is a Professor of Education at the University of Chicago and Director of its Center for School Improvement.

Valerie E. Lee is Associate Professor of Education at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Peter B. Holland is Superintendent of the Belmont school system, Belmont, Massachusetts.

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