Catlin's Notes of Eight Years' Travels and Residence in Europe with His North American Indian Collection: With Anecdotes and Incidents of the Travels and Adventures of Three Different Parties of American Indians Whom He Introduced to the Courts of England, France and Belgium, Volume 2

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The Author, 1848 - England
 

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Page 276 - I have ever known in my own long life, it could be said that none knew her but to love her, none named her but to praise.
Page 176 - ... hungry people that we see in your streets every day when we ride out. We see hundreds of little children with their naked feet in the snow, and we pity them, for we know they are hungry, and we give them money every time we pass by them. In four days, we have given twenty dollars to hungry children — we give our money only to children. We are told that the fathers of these children are in the houses where they sell fire-water, and are drunk, and in their words they every moment abuse and insult...
Page 16 - I have the honour to be, Very respectfully, sir, Your obedient servant, HENRY R.
Page 176 - My friends, I am willing to talk with you, if it can do any good to the hundreds and thousands of poor and hungry people that we see in your streets every day when we ride out. We see hundreds of little children with their naked feet in the snow, and we pity them, for we know they are hungry, and we give them money every time we pass by them.
Page 176 - You talk about sending black-coats among the Indians : now we have no such poor children among us ; we have no such drunkards, or people who abuse the Great Spirit. Indians dare not do so. They pray to the Great Spirit, and he is kind to them. Now we think it would be better for your teachers all to stay at home, and go to work right here in your own streets, where all your good work is wanted. This is my advice. I would rather not say any more.
Page 334 - W. proposed to go down and shew him what effect had been produced on the yearling. When the party arrived at the spot they found that B. and his men had tied their filly short up to a tree in the corner of a field, one side of which was walled and the other hedged in. W. now proposed to B.
Page 17 - Whistles," with which they imitate the chattering of the soaring eagle), with their voices, formed the music for this truly picturesque and exciting dance .... The song in this dance is addressed to their favourite bird the war-eagle, and each dancer carries a fan made of the eagle's tail, in his left hand, as he dances, and by his attitudes endeavours to imitate the motions of the soaring eagle. This, being a part of the war-dance, is a boasting dance...
Page 23 - O-ta-pa ! I am creeping on your track, Keep on your guard, O-ta-pa ! Or I will hop on your back, I will hop on you, I will hop on you. Stand back, my friends, I see them ; The enemies are here, I see them ! They are in a good place, Don't move, I see them ! &c.
Page 176 - Now, my friends, I will tell you, that when we first came over to this country, we thought that where you had so many preachers, so many to read and explain the good book, we should find the white people all good and sober; but as we travel about, we find this was all a mistake.
Page 334 - ... thigh just before they had come up. W. therefore proceeded very cautiously. He climbed the wall, and came at the horse through the tree, to the trunk of which he clung for some time, that he might secure a retreat in case of need.

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