Cato Handbook on Policy

Front Cover
Cato Institute, 2005 - Political Science - 702 pages
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Details how legislators can return the federal goverment to the size and scope envisioned by the Founding Fathers.
 

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Contents

Health and Safety
365
Transportation
375
Antitrust
385
Food and Drug Administration
393
Telecommunications Broadband and Media Polity
399
The Limits of Monetary Policy
417
Major Policy Lessons from the Corporate Scandals
427
Electricity Policy
435

Starving the Beast Will Not Work
113
Federal Tax Reform
117
Fiscal Federalism
131
International Tax Competition
141
The Delegation of Legislative Powers
151
Term Limits
161
Campaign Finance
171
Reclaiming the War Power
181
Tort and Class Action Reform
189
The Patriot Act
199
Militarization of the Home Front
205
Regulation of Electronic Speech and Commerce
213
Property Rights and Regulatory Takings
225
Tobacco and the Rule of Law
243
The War on Drugs
253
Restoring the Right to Bear Arms
261
The Nanny State
269
National ID Cards
275
US Department of Education
283
Higher Education
291
Improving K12 Education
299
Agricultural Policy
311
Cultural Agencies
317
Privatization
325
Corporate Welfare
333
State Fiscal Policy
341
Federal Highway Programs
353
Energy Policy
445
Pollution Polity
457
Public Lands Policy
469
Global Warming and Climate Change
479
Dismantling Al Qaeda
493
Homeland Security
501
The Defense Budget
511
Strategic Nuclear Forces and Missile Defense
523
Transatlantic Relations
531
Nuclear Proliferation and the Terrorist Threat
539
Strengthening the AllVolunteer Military
551
Toward a Sensible US Policy in the Middle East
561
Iraq and the Persian Gulf Getting Out Staying Engaged
571
East Asian Defense Commitments
579
Relations with South and Central Asia
589
The International War on Drugs
599
Relations with China
607
Relations with Russia
617
Relations with Cuba
627
Trade
639
Immigration
649
International Financial Crises and the IMF
661
US Policy toward Latin America
671
Foreign Aid and Economic Development
679
US Policy toward SubSaharan Africa
693
Contributors
701
Copyright

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Popular passages

Page 17 - power: It may be a reflection on human nature that such devices should be necessary to control the abuses of government. But what is government itself but the greatest of all reflections on human nature? If men were angels, no government would be necessary. If angels were to govern men, neither external nor internal controls
Page 17 - But what is government itself but the greatest of all reflections on human nature? If men were angels, no government would be necessary. If angels were to govern men, neither external nor internal controls would be necessary. In framing a government which is to be administered by men over men, the great difficulty lies in this: you must first enable the government to
Page 10 - I have but one lamp by which my feet are guided, and that is the lamp of experience. I know of no way of judging the future but by the past.
Page 12 - when an act of Parliament is against common right and reason, or repugnant, or impossible to be performed, the common law will controul it, and adjudge such Act to be void. The
Page 18 - oblige it to control itself. A dependence on the people is, no doubt, the primary control on the government; but experience has taught mankind the necessity of auxiliary precautions. What

About the author (2005)

David Boaz is executive vice president of the Cato Institute. He is the author of "Libertarianism: A Primer" (an updated edition to be released in 2015 called "The Libertarian Mind"), " "and his articles have appeared in "The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, " and the "Los Angeles Times." He lives in the Washington, DC, area.

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