Caught in the Crossfire: Revolutions, Repression, and the Rational Peasant

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Rowman & Littlefield, 2004 - Social Science - 317 pages
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Caught in the Crossfire presents a multifaceted explanation of why people participate in something as dangerous and uncertain as a revolutionary movement. Beginning with an analysis of the grievances that motivate peasant participation in political movements, the book also explores the additional factors leadership, resources, and strategies required to mobilize peasants for collective action. Collective action itself need not be violent, but a repressive state response can quickly transform a reformist movement into a revolution. Mason shows how different strategies on the part of various actors can result in a government victory, a rebel victory, or a negotiated settlement. The book concludes with a look to the future: Will the emerging trends toward political democratization and economic globalization make revolution in the countryside more or less likely?"
 

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Contents

The Puzzle of Revolution in the Third World
1
Theories of Revolution The Evolution of the Field
28
Dependent Development and the Crisis of Rural Stability
58
Mobilizing Peasant Social Movements
86
The Response of the State Reform or Repression?
115
State Repression and the Escalation of Revolutionary Violence
145
Win Lose or Draw How Civil Wars End
173
Reform Repression and Revolution in El Salvador
197
Peruvian Land Reform and the Rise of Sendero Luminoso
230
The Future of Revolutions in the Countryside Globalization Democratization and Peacekeeping
260
References
285
Index
307
About the Author
317
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About the author (2004)

T. David Mason is professor of political science at the University of North Texas, Denton.

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