Caught in the Middle: Border Communities in the Era of Globalization

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Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, 2001 - Political Science - 340 pages
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In a world with tremendous growth of goods and people flowing across borders, little attention has been paid to the communities through which these goods and people pass and in which people live. Caught in the Middle provides a fascinating look into the inner workings and realities of border communities along five international borders--United States-Canada, United States-Mexico, Germany-Poland, Russia-China, and Russia-Kazakhstan. The volume focuses on innovative cross-border initiatives that contribute unique insights into the daily lives and local perspectives of border communities. Also, it presents a better understanding of the border management issues faced by countries worldwide, as well as of the nature of relationships between federal and local governments, community leaders, government officials, and local communities. By shedding light on existing "best practices" and providing comparative analyses of the challenges and opportunities faced by communities, Caught in the Middle provides valuable lessons for policy makers, governments, and researchers alike.

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Contents

RussiaKazakhstan Border 227
9
A View from
44
FIGURES
45
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

Demetrios G. Papademetriou is the president and cofounder of the Migration Policy Institute. He is also the cofounder and chair emeritus of Metropolis: An International Forum for Research and Policy on Migration and Cities. Deborah W. Meyers is a senior policy analyst at the Migration Policy Institute. Her recent work has focused on U.S., Canada, and Mexico border management issues; North American migration; temporary worker programs; and U.S. immigration policy and process in the post-DHS era.

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