Cause and Meaning in the Social Sciences

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Psychology Press, 2003 - Philosophy - 228 pages
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This volume focuses on key conceptual issues in the social sciences, such as Winch's idea of a social science, structuralism, Malinowski and Evans-Pritchard, and the concept of kinship. In particular it deals with such problems as the relationship of nature and culture, the relevance of concepts drawn from within a given society to its understanding, and the relation of theory to time.
 

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Contents

Chapter 1 Explanation in history
1
Chapter 2 Concepts and society
19
Chapter 3 Winchs idea of a social science
47
Chapter 4 The new idealismcause and meaning in the social sciences
51
Chapter 5 The entry of the philosophers
79
Chapter 6 Time and theory in social anthropology
89
Chapter 7 Sociology and social anthropology
109
Chapter 8 On Malinowski
141
Chapter 11 Ideal language and kinship structure
157
Chapter 12 The concept of kinship
167
Chapter 13 Nature and society in social anthropology
187
Chapter 14 The alchemists of sociology
207
Chapter 15 The sociology of faith
217
Sources
223
Index of names
225
Index of subjects
227

Chapter 9 On EvansPritchard
147
Chapter 10 On structuralism
153

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About the author (2003)

Ernest Gellner was Professor of Philosophy at the London School of Economics from 1962 to 1984, when he became Professor of Social Anthropology at Cambridge University. Before his death in 1995, he was Research Professor and Director of the Center for the Study of Nationalism at the Central European University in Prague. His many books include "Words and Things", "Thoughts and Change", "Saints of the Atlas", "Nations and Nationalism, Culture, Identity and Politics, Plough, Sword, and Book", and "Conditions of Liberty

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