Celebrate the Third Millennium: Facing the Future with Hope

Front Cover
G.K. Hall, Jul 1, 2000 - Religion - 269 pages
0 Reviews
The Bible decreed that we celebrate every fiftieth year as a Jubilee -- a time for repentance, reconciliation, remission and rejoicing. Pope John Paul II calls all Catholics and all humanity to open the twenty-first century with a celebration of love. In readings drawn from two decades of Pope John Paul II's writings, he invites us to live the Jubilee continuously by forgiving others, repairing broken relationships, and rejoicing in every circumstance. Paul Thigpen has arranged the selections according to nine ways of celebrating the jubilee outlined by the bishops of the United States of America.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

A Call to Celebrate
9
Signs of the Times
15
Nine Ways to Live Jubilee
33
Copyright

9 other sections not shown

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2000)

Pope John Paul II was born Karol Wojtyla on May 18, 1920 in Wadowice, Poland. He studied poetry and drama at Jagiellonian University. During World War II, he worked in a stone quarry and chemical factory while preparing for the priesthood. He received a Ph.D. from Rome's Angelicum Institute and a doctorate in theology at the Catholic University of Lublin. He was ordained in 1946 and became Auxiliary Bishop of Krakow in 1958. He was a university chaplain and taught ethics at Krakow and Lublin. In 1964, he became Archbishop of Krakow and in 1967, a Cardinal. On October 16, 1978, he was elected as the first non-Italian Pope since 1523. On May 13, 1981, Pope John Paul II was shot in an assassination attempt entering St. Peter's Square in the Vatican, but recovered fully. During the 1980's and 90's, the Pope visited Africa, Asia, the Americas and in 1993, to the Baltic republics, which was the first Papal visit to countries of the former Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR). He greatly influenced the restoring of democracy and religious freedom in Eastern Europe and reaffirmed the Roman Catholic teachings against homosexuality, abortion, "artificial" methods of reproduction, birth control and priest celibacy. He rejected the ordination of women and opposed direct political participation and office holding of priests. His extensive ethical and theological writings included Fruitful and Responsible Love, Sign of Contradiction, Redemptor Hominis (Redeemer of Man), Evangelium Vitae (The Gospel of Life), and Ut Unum Sint (That They May Be One). After developing septic shock, he died on April 2, 2005. He was proclaimed venerable by Pope Benedict XVI on December 19, 2009 and was beatified on May 1, 2011.

Thigpen holds a PhD in Religion from Emory University and is a fellow in theology at The College of Saint Thomas More in Fort Worth, Texas.

Bibliographic information