Celebrations and elegies

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Carcanet New Press, 1982 - Poetry - 64 pages
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Contents

Goings
7
Autumn
8
Sermon of the Hills
9
The Heart of Night
10
Arrival in Bibbiena Tuscany
11
Remembering Bibbiena in Tuscany
12
A Kind of Catalogue
13
Sparrow
14
Images of Love
26
First Admirers
27
The Near Perfection
28
Given an Apple
29
A Place to Walk
30
Song of Love and Peace
31
Land of Plenty
32
What we Remember
33

Fieldmouse
15
Blackbird Singing
16
Not mine
17
Over and Over
18
Rescued
19
An Elegy before Death
20
Children at Play
21
Landscapes and Figures
22
Heyday
23
Leaves in the Wind
24
Afterwards
25
Peace
34
An Unnerving Lesson
35
Imperfection
36
A Dark Passion
37
Recovering from a Death
38
Words about Grief
39
For a Gentle Friend
40
A Hand Lifting
41
Is it DualNatured?
42
Copyright

References to this book

About the author (1982)

Elizabeth Jennings was born in Boston, England. Educated at Oxford High School and St. Anne's College, Oxford, she worked in the Oxford City Library from 1950 to 1958 and then as a reader for the publisher Chatto & Windus. Since 1961 she has been a freelance writer. She lived in Oxford but often visited Italy, where many of her poems are set. After a difficult period, which included stays in a mental hospital, Jennings has written strongly religious verse. She has said that "my Roman Catholic religion and my poems are the most important things in my life." Jennings is one of the major figures associated with the Movement, one of the most important "movements" in postwar British poetry. Movement poetry is meticulously crafted, controlled and common-sensical, sardonic, lucid, and self-consciously ironic. Jennings writes a restrained, sometimes lapidary, poetry of lucid diction and traditional meters. The Italian setting and profound religious conviction distinguish her work from that of the other Movement writers, as does her more personal and confessional stance. She has done numerous translations, including an interesting version of Michelangelo's sonnets.

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