Cell Lineage and Fate Determination

Front Cover
Sally A. Moody
Elsevier, Oct 29, 1998 - Science - 644 pages
Cell Lineage and Fate Determination provides a comprehensive view of the mechanisms regulating cell lineage and fate determination in an effort to understand how the fertilized egg is transformed into a complex of specialized tissues. It presents basic information on eight different animal models and recent developmental biological research done in each model. The book provides a focused forum presenting key information for researchers studying various aspects of developmental and cellular biology. Extensive use of tables and black-and-white and color figures helps illustrate each model. The book concludes by discussing future goals for bringing cellular, molecular, and genetic research to clinical applications and tissue replacement therapies.

Key Features
* Presents eight different animal models
* Provides a focused forum on cell fate determination that provides comprehensive and key information for researchers
* Illustrates the transitional relationship between researchers and clinicians
* Includes the extensive use of tables and color figures
 

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Contents

Nematode
75
Leech
171
Drosophila
225
Frog
287
Zebrafish
369
Chick
427
Mammals
475
Vertebrate Tissue Specification
549
Index
635
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About the author (1998)

Sally A. Moody is Professor of Anatomy and Cell Biology at the George Washington University Medical Center, and a member of both the Neuroscience and Genetics programs. Prior to this appointment she was on the faculty of the Anatomy and Cell Biology Department, the Department of Neuroscience, and the Developmental Biology program at the University of Virginia. She trained in developmental neurobiology at the University of Florida’s Department of Neuroscience and the University of Utah’s Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy. Dr. Moody’s current research focuses on the cascade of interactions that instruct lineages to give rise to the frog nervous system. She has taught developmental neurobiology in the MBL "Neurobiology" course and was co-director of the "Early Development of Xenopus Laevis" course at the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. She has also served on many National Institute of Health advisory committees dealing with issues in developmental biology and developmental neurobiology, and served on the Board of Trustees of the Society for Developmental Biology.