Centennial History of the Carnegie Institution of Washington: Volume 2, The Department of Terrestrial Magnetism

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Cambridge University Press, 2004 - Science - 314 pages
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The second of five Histories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington describes the work of the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism. Since its beginning in 1904 the department has witnessed an astonishingly broad range of research projects, from terrestrial magnetism, ionospheric physics and geochemistry to biophysics and planetary science. Contemporary photographs illustrate some of the remarkable expeditions and instruments developed in the pursuit of scientific understanding, from sailing ships to nuclear particle accelerators and radio telescopes to mass spectrometers. This is the story of the exciting evolution of scientific ideas.
 

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Contents

1 Establishment
1
2 Cruises and war
9
3 Expeditions
23
magnetic and electric
33
5 The Fleming transition
41
6 The last cruise
47
7 The magnetic observatories and final land observations
51
8 The ionosphere
55
21 Isotope geology
157
22 Radio astronomy
163
23 Image tubes
175
24 Computers
183
25 Earthquake seismology
187
26 Strainmeters
195
27 The Bolton and Wetherill years
203
28 Astronomy
209

9 Collaboration and evaluation
65
10 The Tesla coil
73
11 The Van de Graaff accelerator
81
12 The nuclear force
89
13 Fission
97
14 Cosmic rays
103
15 The proximity fuze and the war effort
109
16 The Tuve transition
117
17 Postwar nuclear physics
125
18 The cyclotron
133
19 Biophysics
139
20 Explosion seismology
149
29 The solar system
221
30 Geochemistry
227
31 Islandarc volcanoes
233
32 Seismology revisited
239
33 Geochemistry and cosmochemistry
245
34 The Solomon transition
253
35 The support staff
257
36 Epilogue
267
Notes
275
Index
282
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