Central-station Electric Lighting: With Notes on the Methods Used for the Distribution of Electricity

Front Cover
Spon, 1888 - Electric light plants - 128 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 16 - Trade, replying last week to a Question in the House of Commons, said that since the passing of the Electric Lighting Act of 1882, 59 provisional orders and five licences had been granted to Companies, and 15 provisional orders and two licences to Local Authorities. The President of the Board of Trade was not aware that in any single case where these powers had been obtained they had been exercised.
Page 134 - PRECAUTIONS TO BE ADOPTED ON INTRODUCING THE ELECTRIC LIGHT, WITH NOTES ON THE PREVENTION OF FIRE RISKS.
Page 25 - ... compound cable coiled into a solenoid, through which is passed a bundle of iron wires ; the projecting ends are then bent over to close the magnetic circuit on the outside of the solenoid, and the whole is encased in a perforated metal cylinder with wooden ends. In their latest design of transformer the coils are circular in plan and rectangular in section, and are surrounded by groups of U-shaped soft iron stampings slipped over from both sides and held together by two circular cast-iron plates...
Page 19 - The current is generated by two dynamos, each weighing 45 tons, and having revolving-magnet wheels 9 feet 8 inches in diameter, 22 tons in weight, a third machine being kept in reserve. These dynamos are separately excited, and produce alternating currents. The electricity is led to a large switch-board for distribution throughout the district by means of five sub-stations ; and from this board there branches a double system of mains, which run everywhere side by side, one-half the mains being connected...
Page 109 - Deflection. — The angle or number of degrees through which the needle of a galvanometer moves when a current is passing through its coils.
Page 44 - Edison type, with horizontal magnets ; seven of these machines are connected to the feeders which supply the mains, and these cover the district to be lighted on the Edison network system. The motive power is furnished by six Armington-Sims, and two Porter-Allen engines, each connected direct to the armature of a dynamo, the speed being maintained at the uniform rate of 350 revolutions per minute, except in the case of the spare engine and dynamo, which is kept turning slowly, ready to be switched...
Page 10 - In the incandescent or glow lamp light is produced by the passage of a current of electricity through a...
Page 63 - The current is maintained at 10 amperes, and the potential between independent groups of lamps is 53.6 volts. The aggregate energy lost, in overcoming the resistance of the main leads, switches and cut-outs, is 12 - 8 per cent. of the total electrical energy generated at the central station- — a very satisfactory result on a system of over 37 miles of streets. The electro-motive force in the conductors is about 1,400 volts, which is below the normal capacity of a Brush machine,1 thus allowing more...
Page 34 - The regulating apparatus employed consists of a small transformer, the primary coil of which is traversed by the whole, or by a proportionate part, of the main circuit, while the secondary coil is inserted into the exciting circuit. Thus, if the main current increases, the exciting current induced in the two armature coils of the dynamo is reinforced by the inductive action of the regulating transformer ; and the field of the dynamo is strengthened when more current is required. The opposite takes...
Page 19 - ... arc lamps. The system adopted is that designed by Mr. JE Gordon, and has now been successfully worked for some time ; but the many accessories which are introduced, such as telephones, telegraphs, and indicators, make it complicated in comparison with gas, or •even with the ordinary electric-light systems. The current is generated by two dynamos, each weighing 45 tons, and having revolving-magnet wheels 9 feet 8 inches in diameter, 22 tons in weight, a third machine being kept in reserve. These...

Bibliographic information