Central-station electric service: its commercial development and economic significance as set forth in the public addresses (1897-1914) of Samuel Insull ...

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Priv. Print., 1915 - Electric power-plants - 495 pages
 

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Page 349 - to those workers in physical science or technology, without regard to country, whose efforts have, in the judgment of the Institute, done most to advance a knowledge of physical science or its applications.
Page xxx - the business methods which prevailed throughout the earlier Menlo Park days of "storm and stress," and the curious conditions with which he had to deal as private secretary: "I never attempted to systematize Edison's business life. Edison's whole method of work would upset the system of any office. He was just as likely to be at
Page 350 - There are three things which make a nation great and prosperous — a fertile soil, busy workshops, and easy conveyance for man and goods from place to place.
Page 349 - of all inventions, the alphabet and the printing press alone excepted, those inventions which abridge distance have done most for civilization.
Page 349 - whose efforts have, in the judgment of the Institute, done most to advance a knowledge of physical science or its applications.
Page xxix - trouble for lack of money. Mr. Insull was then my business manager, running the whole thing; and, therefore, when Mr. Henry Villard and his syndicate offered to buy us out, we concluded it was better to be sure than be sorry; so we sold out for a large sum.
Page xviii - true that the man who causes two blades of grass to grow where one grew before is a benefactor of the
Page 365 - of Boston; HM Byllesby, head of the firm of HM Byllesby & Co.; Henry L. Doherty, head of the firm of Henry L. Doherty & Co.; Charles L. Edgar, president of the Edison Electric Illuminating Company of Boston;
Page 177 - is a subject to which we have given a great deal of attention in the past, and will be forced to give a great deal of attention in the future. But I know of no subject that will bring us greater return
Page xxxi - industry I feel I owe to the tuition of Edison. He was about the most willing tutor, and I must confess that he had to be a patient one.

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