Centuries' Ends, Narrative Means

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This pathbreaking work uses the approaching conclusion of the second millennium as a context for discussing questions concerning temporal division and narrative continuity. It investigates assumptions about teleology and eschatology while exploring the ways in which temporal division affects the creation and production of cultural texts and, reciprocally, the ways in which narrative techniques, forms, and conventions shape, explain, and justify history.

Through this exploration, the volume examines how temporal thresholds tend simultaneously to reinforce and to disrupt conceptual boundaries. The sixteen essays use the significance typically invested in historical junctures marked by a centenary advance to investigate perceived paradigm shifts and the consequent reactions to these implicit and explicit transitions. By doing so, they also seek to illuminate the relations between narrative and history, and to enhance understanding of our present historical moment.

 

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Contents

Stories of History and Narrative
13
Historical and Ideological
58
Being Done with Narrative by Cubism and André Malraux
79
Trahernes Centuries
89
Turners Frontier Thesis as a Narrative
117
Rogue Nationalism
138
War and Population Control
151
Reflections on Crossing
160
Whats Awkward About The Awkward Age?
212
Gender and Desire in History
223
Hamlet The Revengers Tragedy
238
Once Upon a Time Not Long Ago O
261
Posthuman Narratives
276
Fin de Siècle and the Technological Sublime
302
Notes
319
Index
379

Fin de Siècle Fates Mournings
169
Death
191

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About the author (1996)

Robert Newman is Professor of English at the University of South Carolina. He is the author, most recently, of Transgressions of Reading.

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