Cha Dao: The Way of Tea, Tea as a Way of Life

Front Cover
Singing Dragon, Oct 15, 2010 - Philosophy - 176 pages
0 Reviews
In China, the art and practice of drinking tea is about much more than merely soaking leaves in a cup of hot water. The tradition is rooted in Daoism, and emerged from a philosophy that honoured living a life of grace and gratitude, balance and harmony, and fulfilment and enjoyment - what the ancient Chinese called Cha Dao, or the Way of Tea. Cha Dao takes us on a fascinating journey through the Way of Tea, from its origins in the sacred mountains and temples of ancient China, through its links to Daoist concepts such as Wu Wei or non-striving and the Value of Worthlessness, to the affinity between Tea Mind and the Japanese spirit of Zen. Interspersed are a liberal helping of quotes from the great tea masters of the past, anecdotes from the author's own trips to China, and traditional tea stories from China and Japan. The unique health benefits of tea are also explored, and a chapter is devoted to describing the history, characteristics and properties of 25 different tea varieties. This book will interest tea lovers, as well as those who want to learn more about tea culture, Daoist and Zen thought and practice, and Asian history and culture.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

1 Cha Dao
8
2 A Brief History of Tea in Ch
29
3 Lu Meets a True Tea Master
47
4 Tea Mind Zen Mind
57
5 Just One Flower
76
Or the Art of Doing Nothing
81
7 One Last Cup
89
8 The Uncarved Block
95
12 Making a Cup of Tea
129
13 A Gong Fu Tea Ceremony
135
14 The Health Benefits of Tea
141
15 Types of Tea
148
16 Tea Time
159
17 A Few Last Words
163
Sources for Tea
166
Bibliography
169

A Tale of Tea and Enlightenment
101
10 The Value of Worthlessness
114
11 A Daoist Tea Ceremony
123
About the Author
170
BACK COVER
174
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2010)

Solala Towler is an instructor of Daoist meditation and of several styles of Qigong, including Soaring Crane Qigong, Essence Qigong, and Wuji Qigong. He has studied the Daoist arts for over 20 years, and has led many tours to China to visit the sacred mountains and temples of Daoism. He is the author of 12 books on Qigong and the Daoist arts, is a former president of the National Qigong Association, and is the editor of The Empty Vessel: The Journal of Daoist Philosophy and Practice. To find out more about Solala's work, visit his website at www.abodetao.com.

Bibliographic information