Challenge of Organizational Change: How Companies Experience It And Leaders Guide It

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Simon and Schuster, Apr 1, 2003 - Business & Economics - 556 pages
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In an era of increased global competition, of takeovers, downsizing, restructuring, and even outright failure, managing intelligent organizational change is the most difficult challenge facing business. Kanter, Stein, and Jick present here a comprehensive overview and an authoritative model for how to and, in some cases how not to, institute change in organizations.
Building upon their "Big Three" model of change, the authors focus on internal and external forces that set events in motion; the major kinds of change that correspond to external and internal change pressures; and the principal tasks involved in managing the change process. Several "portraits" of companies undergoing different types of change, coupled with the authors' own expert analyses, prove that no one person or group can make change "happen" alone. Instead, the authors assert that it is the delicate balance among key players that makes organizational change a success.
The authors analyze the forces for change by examining Banc One, Apple Computer, and Lehman Brothers, among others, to illustrate environmental and cyclical change as businesses grow. Then they turn to forms of change, drawing on the Western-Delta merger, strategy change at Bell Atlantic, and takeover turmoil at Lucky Stores, to show how companies change their structures and cultures. The section on execution of change shows "change masters," to use Kanter's own famous term, at work at Motorola, General Electric, and other leading firms, as well as the difficulties of implementing change at General Motors and Microswitch.
Fundamental organizational change, they argue, is exemplified by identity change, involving much more than the transfer of tangible assets. Managing the feelings, fears, and hopes of people must be the central strategy during such transitions. In this essential volume for managers and analysts of change, Kanter, Stein, and Jick offer powerful insights, practical new directions for action, prospects for the future of deliberate organizational change, and advice on where to begin the change process, and when: NOW!
 

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Contents

The Big Three Model of Change
3
Macro
63
of the Katz Family Business by James
69
by Paul S Myers and Rosabeth Moss Kanter
80
New York by James Lardner
92
Philippines and London by John Maxwell Hamilton
108
MicroEvolutionary
125
Diary of a Middle Manager
145
Control Change
334
Case of O M Scott by George P Baker
349
Roles and Tasks
369
by Susan Rosegrant and Todd Jick
398
Behind the Steering Wheel at General Motors
406
An Interview with Roger Smith
414
Bob Galvin and Motorola Inc by Todd Jick
420
Change
429

Lubenow and Michael Rogers
151
Donald R Katz
159
Revolutionary Change
173
Stanley W Angrist
203
Change in Form Forms of Change
211
Delta Story by Cynthia A Ingois and Paul S Myers
268
by Kuniyasu Sakai
276
Shaping Up Skinnying Down
286
with Bell Atlantics Raymond Smith
302
by Barry A Stein
324
Change at Micro Switch by Susan Rosegrant
439
Toward a Boundaryless Firm at General
450
British Airs Profitable Private Life by Steve Lohr
456
Growth by Dwight Harshbarger
467
Thomas A Stewart
474
One Managers Personal Story
483
Where to Begin
489
Index
521
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Rosabeth Moss Kanter, Class of 1960 Professor at Harvard Business School and editor of the Harvard Business Review, is an international authority on organizational change. She is author of the prize-winning books, Men and Women of the Corporation (1977), The Change Masters (1983), and When Giants Learn to Dance (1989).

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