Chambers's Encyclopaedia: A Dictionary of Universal Knowledge for the People, Volume 9

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W. and R. Chambers, 1868 - Encyclopedias and dictionaries
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Page 354 - When all is done, (he concludes,) human life is at the greatest and the best but like a froward child, that must be played with and humoured a little to keep it quiet, till it falls asleep, and then the care is over.
Page 314 - Ye shall not round the corners of your heads, neither shalt thou mar the corners of thy beard. 28 Ye shall not make any cuttings in your flesh for the dead, nor print any marks upon you : I am the LORD.
Page 181 - Her feet beneath her petticoat Like little mice stole in and out, As if they feared the light: But, oh ! she dances such a way— No sun upon an Easter day Is half so fine a sight.
Page 164 - Lives of the Queens of Scotland, and English Princesses connected with the Regal Succession of Great Britain.
Page 109 - The Christian Hero: an Argument proving that no Principles but those of Religion are sufficient to make a great man.
Page 80 - Cuthbert, round which were displayed those of St. Peter of York, St. John of Beverley, and St. Wilfred of Ripon.
Page 26 - ... do occur, can we doubt (remembering that many more individuals are born than can possibly survive) that individuals having any advantage, however slight, over others, would have the best chance of surviving and of procreating their kind ? On the other hand, we may feel sure that any variation in the least degree injurious would be rigidly destroyed. This preservation of favourable individual differences and variations, and the destruction of those which are injurious, I have called Natural Selection,...
Page 220 - VIII. c. 1, declared the king and his successors to be the ' only supreme head on earth of the Church of England.
Page 26 - Can it then be thought improbable, seeing that variations useful to man have undoubtedly occurred, that other variations useful in some way to each being in the great and complex battle of life, should occur in the course of many successive generations? If such do occur, can we doubt (remembering that many more individuals are born than can possibly survive) that individuals having any advantage, however slight, over others, would have the best chance of surviving and of procreating their kind?
Page 211 - ... and cursing and swearing in a manner so horrid as to convey to any serious mind an idea of hell rather than any other place.

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