Chamonix and the range of Mont Blanc: a guide

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[J.]Murray, 1902
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Page 7 - Civilities, and endeavoured also to dissuade us ; there were others who represented the Thing as mighty easy ; but we perceived plainly, that they expected, that after we had bargain'd with them to be our Guides, we should soon tire and that they should earn their Money with little Trouble. However, our Curiosity got the better of these Discouragements, and relying on our Strength and Resolution, we determined to attempt climbing the Mountain. We took with us several Peasants, some to be our Guides,...
Page 50 - ... left. I was thrown instantly off my feet, but was still on my knees and endeavouring to regain my footing, when, in a few seconds, the snow on our right, which was of course above us, rushed into the gap thus suddenly made, and completed the catastrophe by burying us all at once in its mass, and hurrying us downwards towards two crevasses about a furlong below us, and nearly parallel to the line of our march. The accumulation of snow instantly threw me backwards, and I was carried down, in spite...
Page 51 - ... alive, sheltered by some projection of the icy walls of the crevasse ; but, alas ! all was silent as the grave, and we had too much reason to fear, that they were long since insensible, and probably at a vast depth beneath the snow on which we were standing. We could see no bottom to the gulf on each side of the pile of snow on which we stood ; the sides of the crevasse were here, as in other places, solid ice, of a cerulean colour, and very beautiful to the eye.
Page 56 - We have no food. My feet are already frozen, and I am exhausted. I have only strength to write a few words. I die in the faith of Jesus Christ, with affectionate thoughts of my family — my remembrance to all. I trust we may meet in heaven.
Page 7 - In order to prevent those among us who were the most in wind, from fatiguing the rest, by pushing on too fast, we made the following Rules: That no one should go out of his Rank; That he who led the way should go a slow and even Pace; That who ever found himself fatigued, or out of Breath, might call for a Halt; And lastly, that when ever we found a Spring we should drink some of our Wine, mixed with Water, and fill up the Bottles, we had emptied, with Water, to serve us at other Halts where we should...
Page 50 - Mathieu Balmat, who was fourth in the line, being a man of great muscular strength, as well as presence of mind, had suddenly thrust his pole into the firm snow beneath, when he felt himself going, which certainly checked, in some measure, the force of his fall. Our two hindermost guides were...
Page 44 - I copied all my pictures on a comparatively large scale — about three feet high — with such daring lights, and shadows, and streaks of sunset, that I have since trembled at my temerity as I looked at them ; and then contriving some simple mechanism with a carpenter, to make them roll on, I selected the most interesting parts of Mr. Auldjo's narrative, and with a few interpolations of my own, produced a lecture which, in the village, was considered quite a
Page 50 - ... two crevasses about a furlong below us, and nearly parallel to the line of our march. The accumulation of snow instantly threw me backwards, and I was carried down in spite of all my struggles. In less than a minute I emerged, partly from my own exertions, and partly because the velocity of the falling mass had subsided from its own friction. I was obliged to resign my pole in the struggle, feeling it forced out of my hand. A short time afterwards, I found it on the very brink of the crevasse....
Page 51 - At length, being thoroughly convinced, from the relative positions of the party when the accident happened, that the poor fellows were indeed in the crevasse, at the spot pointed out by Mathieu Balmat, the brother of one of them — in our opinion, only one thing remained to be done, and that was to venture down upon the snow which had fallen in, and, as a forlorn hope, to fathom its unknown depths with our poles. After having thus made every effort in our power for their recovery, we agreed to abandon...
Page 50 - ... when Mathieu Balmat cried out that some of the party were lost, and pointed to the crevasse, which had hitherto escaped our notice, into which, he said, they had fallen. A nearer view convinced us all of the sad truth. The three front...

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