Champlain, a drama in three acts: with an introduction entitled Twenty years and after

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F. Warne & Co., 1908
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Page 245 - The history of their labors is connected with the origin of every celebrated town in the annals of French America : not a cape was turned, nor a river entered, but a Jesuit led the way.
Page 276 - Channels where ships might float and broad reaches of water stretched between them, and Champlain entered the lake which preserves his name to posterity. Cumberland Head was passed, and from the opening of the great channel between Grande Isle and the main he could look forth on the wilderness sea. Edged with woods, the tranquil flood spread southward beyond the sight. Far on the left...
Page 42 - ... excellent work emanating from a scholarly pen, claims that had the various commercial companies followed up their first efforts by continuing to pay year by year due regard to the fulfilment of their obligations, then would this colony of New France soon have become considerable in numbers and marketable resources, and have been in a position to ward off the lamentable train of miseries by which it came to be afflicted afterwards, through neglect, internal weakness, dissension, and external hostility....
Page 292 - Chile inspired in him, praising it highly as a privileged land because of the mildness of its climate, the fertility of its soil, and the abundance of its natural products.
Page 49 - ... pourtray the nobility of Champlain's perseverance in presence of the meanness of spirit inherent in the recurring trading companies and their representatives, who were for ever breaking faith with their obligations, to the detriment of the pioneers. The elaboration of the contrast between the constancy of beneficence and the inconstancy of self-seeking is the main intention of the piece ; with Beauchasse and the De Caens as persistents in the one case, and Champlain and Pontgrave in the other,...
Page 271 - LESCARBOT. number had been killed ; others were sick or wounded ; and thus, on the fourteenth of November, with somewhat downcast visages, they guided their helpless vessel with a pair of oars to the landing at Port Royal. " I will not," says Lescarbot, " compare their perils to those of Ulysses, nor yet of ^Eneas, lest thereby I should sully our holy enterprise with things impure.
Page 49 - The various scenes pourtray the nobility of Champlain's perseverance in presence of the meanness of spirit inherent in the recurring trading companies and their representatives, who were for ever breaking faith with their obligations, to the detriment of the pioneers. The elaboration of the contrast between the constancy of...
Page 250 - It was a fashion at this period among the ladies of Paris to have hanging at their side a small looking-glass, framed in gold or silver, and otherwise ornamented with jewels; and the fashion was one which Madame de Champlain did not lay aside when she came over from France with her husband.
Page 30 - They were to have a perpetual monopoly of the fur trade, and a fifteen years' monopoly of all other commercial undertakings within these bounds.
Page 256 - Father George to make to his Majesty their humble remonstrances, trusting to his well-known prudence to do in their behalf whatever he may consider to be most conducive to the welfare and advancement of the colony.

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