Chance: The Life of Games & the Game of Life

Front Cover
Springer Science & Business Media, Feb 2, 2008 - Science - 224 pages
0 Reviews
Our lives are immersed in a sea of chance. Everyone’s existence is a meeting point of a multitude of accidents. The origin of the word ‘chance’ is usually traced back to the vulgar Latin word ‘cadentia’, meaning a befalling by fortuitous circumstances, with no knowable or determinable causes. The Roman philosopher Cicero clearly expressed the idea of ‘chance’ in his work De Divinatione: For we do not apply the words ‘chance’, ‘luck’, ‘accident’ or ‘casualty’ except toanevent which hassooccurredorhappened that it either might not have occurred at all, or might have occurred in any other way. 2.VI.15. For if a thing that is going to happen, may happen in one way or another, indi?erently, chance is predominant; but things that happen by chance cannot be certain. 2.IX.24. Ina certain sensechance isthespiceoflife. Iftherewerenophenomena with unforeseeable outcomes, phenomena with an element of chance, all temporal cause–e?ect sequences would be completely deterministic.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

I
1
II
2
III
4
IV
8
V
11
VI
14
VII
18
VIII
19
LI
107
LII
109
LIII
111
LIV
113
LV
114
LVI
117
LVII
120
LVIII
121

IX
20
X
21
XI
22
XII
24
XIII
25
XIV
27
XV
28
XVI
29
XVII
33
XVIII
36
XX
37
XXI
39
XXII
40
XXIII
41
XXIV
45
XXV
48
XXVI
51
XXVII
52
XXVIII
54
XXIX
57
XXX
59
XXXI
60
XXXII
62
XXXIII
63
XXXIV
66
XXXV
69
XXXVI
72
XXXVII
75
XXXVIII
76
XXXIX
78
XL
79
XLI
82
XLII
84
XLIII
86
XLIV
89
XLV
93
XLVI
95
XLVII
96
XLVIII
98
XLIX
101
L
102
LIX
124
LX
128
LXI
134
LXII
136
LXIII
139
LXIV
142
LXV
146
LXVI
149
LXVII
153
LXVIII
155
LXIX
157
LXX
159
LXXI
160
LXXII
163
LXXIII
166
LXXIV
169
LXXV
171
LXXVI
174
LXXVII
178
LXXVIII
181
LXXIX
184
LXXX
188
LXXXI
191
LXXXII
194
LXXXIII
195
LXXXIV
196
LXXXV
199
LXXXVI
204
LXXXVII
207
LXXXVIII
209
LXXXIX
211
XC
213
XCI
215
XCII
216
XCIII
217
XCIV
218
XCV
219
XCVI
220
XCVII
221
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 3 - According to this principle, a division into "equally possible" cases is conceivable in any kind of observations, and the probability of an event is the ratio between the number of cases favorable to the event and the total number of possible cases. The weakness in this concept is apparent.

About the author (2008)

J.P. Marques de Sá is Full Professor at the Engineering Faculty of the University of Porto. He is chairman of the Signal Processing Group of the Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Porto. His research interests are in the areas of Physiological Signal Analysis, Pattern Recognition and Neural Networks. He is a reviewer for several scientific journals and chairman of the "Summer School on Neural Networks" annually held at Porto. He is author of six books, four in Portuguese and two in English.

Bibliographic information