Changing Contours of Work: Jobs and Opportunities in the New Economy: Jobs and Opportunities in the New Economy

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SAGE, Apr 12, 2012 - Business & Economics - 280 pages
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In the highly-anticipated second edition of Changing Contours of Work: Jobs and Opportunities in the New Economy, authors Sweet and Meiskins once again provide a rich analysis of the American workplace in the larger context of an integrated global economy. Through engaging vignettes and rich data, this text frames the development of jobs and employment opportunities in an international comparative perspective, revealing the historical transformations of work and identifying the profound effects that these changes have had on lives, jobs, and life chances. This text brings into focus the many complexities of class, race, and gender inequalities in the modern-day workplace, as well as details the consequences of job insecurity and work schedules mismatched to family needs. Throughout, strategic recommendations are offered that could help make the new economy work for us all.
 

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Contents

Exhibit 1
1
Exhibit 4
4
Exhibit 6
6
Exhibit 1
11
Exhibit 1
18
New Products New Ways of Working and the New Economy
23
1
24
3
25
A Fair Days Work? The Intensity and Scheduling
99
1
102
5
108
Percentages of Employed Persons Working on Their Main
118
Gender Chasms in the New Economy
125
1
130
Womens and Mens Earnings and Income Ratios for FullTime
133
Percentages of Husbands and Wives Reporting That Their Career
139

Percentages of Companies Offering Flexible Work Options
39
Economic Inequality Social Mobility and the New Economy
49
1
51
6
64
Whose Jobs Are Secure?
75
1
78
19962010
84
Percentages of Displaced Professional Workers Who Received
90
11
155
Legacies of the Past
161
1
164
Reshaping the Contours of the New Economy
195
Legislative and Regulatory Timeline
225
References
231
Index
265
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

Stephen Sweet is Associate Professor and Chair of Sociology at Ithaca College and formerly the associate director of the Cornell Careers Institute, a Sloan Center for the Study of Working Families. He has written a number of articles on the challenges confronting working families, focusing on the issues of concern to dual career couples across the life course. His studies have appeared in a variety of publications, including the New Directions in Life Course Research, Journal of Vocational Behavior, Journal of Marriage and the Family, Innovative Higher Education, The International Journal of Mass Emergencies and Disasters, Journal of College Student Development, and Community, Work, and Family. Stephen’s other book with SAGE is The Work-Family Interface. He has also published The Handbook of Work and Family with co-authors Marcie Pitt-Catsouphes and Ellen Ernst Kossek;  Managing Careers in the New Risk Economy, with co-investigator Phyllis Moen; College and Society: An Introduction to the Sociological Imagination, and Data Analysis with SPSS: A First Course in Applied Statistics. Stephen has been the recipient of a Sloan Officers Grant to study the effects of corporate downsizing on dual earner couples.

Peter Meiksins is a Professor of Sociology at Cleveland State University. He is the author of many articles on the sociology of work, including studies of the work experiences of engineers and part-time work in professional technical occupations and essays on labor process theory, professional work in comparative perspective, and contemporary labor relations. His work has appeared in a variety of journals, including Work and Occupations, Theory and Society, Economic and Industrial Democracy, Work, Employment and Society, and Sociological Quarterly. He is the author of Putting Work in Its Place: A Quiet Revolution (with Peter Whalley) and of Engineering Labour: Technical Workers in Comparative Perspective (with Chris Smith). Peter’s other books are Rethinking the Labor Process (with Mark Wardell and Tom Steiger) and Rising From the Ashes: Labor in the Age of Global Capitalism (with Ellen Wood and Michael Yates). He and co-investigator Peter Whalley received a major grant from the Sloan Foundation to study “Flexible Work for Technical Professionals.” Peter’s current research concerns the sociology of design work (a study of the work of graphic designers, industrial designers and interior designers). This research has been supported by a Fund for the Advancement of the Discipline grant from the American Sociological Foundation.

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