Changing Korea: understanding culture and communication

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Peter Lang, 2008 - Business & Economics - 206 pages
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In the last fifty years, Korea has transformed itself from an agrarian, Confucian-based culture into a global and technological powerhouse, and one of the most important political and economic forces in the world. Based on previous research and face-to-face interviews, the book shows how contemporary Koreans negotiate traditional Confucian values and Western capitalistic values in their everyday encounters - particularly in business and professional contexts. This is a useful companion book for courses in international business, intercultural communication, and Asian studies.

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Contents

From Confucianism to ConfucianCapitalism
3
Collectivism vs Individualism
25
InCroup Membership in Contemporary Korean Society
81
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

T. Youn-ja Shim is the former Director of Global Entertainment Business in the Marshall School of Business at the University of Southern California. Prior to that she served as Associate Director of the Center for Asian Business, Loyola Marymount University, Los Angeles, where she developed and was the Director of the International MBA in the Media and taught intercultural communication theory. Earlier Shim worked as a vice president and branch manager in the banking industry.

Min-Sun Kim (Ph.D., Michigan State University, 1992) is Professor in the Department of Speech at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Her research focuses on the role of cognition in conversational styles among people of different cultural orientations. She has applied her models (based on conversational constraints) in the areas of requesting, re-requesting, conflict styles, communication motivation, etc. She has conducted extensive research in this and related areas and has published more than 40 research papers in major communication journals, plus several more papers which are in press. Her two newest theoretical developments, focusing on relativity of communication constructs, appeared in two consecutive volumes of Communication Yearbook (Vol. 22 and Vol. 23) . She is the recipient of numerous top paper awards in major international communication conferences, and was recently invited to give a keynote speech on Paradigms of Cultural Identity at the 3rd annual conference of the David C. Lam Institute for East-West Studies, Hong Kong. She has served as a Division Secretary for the International and Intercultural Communication Division of the International Communication Association. Since 1994, the author has also served as a workshop leader for the annual Summer Workshop for the Development of Intercultural Coursework at Colleges and Universities (which is run by the Center for International Business Education and Research at the University of Hawaii at Manoa). She is currently serving as an Associate Editor for Communication Reports and also as a reviewer for various communication journals.

Judith N. Martin is currently Herberger Professor of Communication in the Hugh Downs School of Human Communication at Arizona State University. She received her Ph.D. in speech communication from the Pennsylvania State University. She also studied at the Universite de Grenoble for a year, and was involved in study aboard administration for a number of years. She also has experience in cross cultural training and has co-authored three books with Prof. Tom Nakayama. Her current research interests focus on: the role of communication in cross cultural transitions, white identity and and communication, and pedagogical issues in teaching intercultural communication.