Chaos: Making a New Science

Front Cover
Vintage, 1997 - Chaos - 352 pages
23 Reviews
This book brings together different work in the new field of physics called the chaos theory, an extension of classical mechanics, in which simple and complex causes are seen to interact. Mathematics may only be able to solve simple linear equations which experiment has pushed nature into obeying in a limited way, but now that computers can map the whole plane of solutions of non-linear equations a new vision of nature is revealed. The implications are staggeringly universal in all areas of scientific work and philosophical thought.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - TheAmpersand - LibraryThing

First, a couple of caveats: "Chaos: Making a New Science" was written almost twenty-five years ago, so I don't know how up-to-date it is. Also, sadly enough, I can't say I know too much about any sort ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - keylawk - LibraryThing

Chaos studied here. The author makes the new way of understanding, well, everything, remarkably transparent. In the sense that I can see it, but still, I don't understand it. (!) This is not like ... Read full review

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About the author (1997)

James Gleick was born in New York City and graduated from Harvard College. For ten years he was an editor at the New York Times. Chaos: Making a New Science was a 1987 National Book Award and Pulitzer Prize nominee, and has been translated into eighteen languages. His most recent book is Genius: Richard Feynman and modern physics. He lives in New York with his wife and their son.

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