Knots for Boaters

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Hearst Books, Apr 1, 2003 - Sports & Recreation - 192 pages
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You need the right boater's knot every time. Out of thousands of possible knots, only a handful are sufficiently versatile, trustworthy, and easily understood to be useful on a boat, and you'll find them all here. Illustrated instructions make tying and securing them simple; each knot's purpose is described as well as its differences from related knots. Whether you want to make a built-in handle at the end of a water bucket, lash oars or other deck gear in place, attach the foot of a sail to a boom, or even extend a towing line, check it on these pages first. Bonus; Practical tips on safe winching, proper tackle setups, and rope-end whipping.
 

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Contents

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 6 FOREWORD
7
BINDING KNOTS
17
LOOP KNOTS
47
COILING
119
SECURING A COIL
125
MECHANICAL ADVANTAGE Purchase
135
WHIPPINGS AND SEIZINGS
153
GLOSSARY 179 CHARTS 189 INDEX
191
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Writer-rigger Brion Toss became obsessed with knots in the late 1960s, a preoccupation that led him to sailing and rigging. He has rigged everything from tiny daysailers to huge square-riggers. Equally at home with modern or traditional rigging, Toss continues to pursue the challenge of designing The Ideal Rig--that unique combination of details best suited to a particular boat and its particular crew. When not writing or lecturing about knots and rigging, he can be found at work at Brion Toss Rigging, his shop in Port Townsend, Washington.

Robert Shetterly lives and works in Brooksville, Maine. He got hooked on drawing at Harvard University and later taught in a one-room schoolhouse, dug clams, and worked in a fish factory to support his habit. In 1980, he left an art editor position at "Farmstead Magazine" to become a full-time freelance illustrator. He has illustrated many books, and he continues to create what he calls his own "peculiar drawings.

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