Chapman's Homeric Hymns and Other Homerica

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Princeton University Press, 2008 - Literary Collections - 228 pages
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George Chapman's translations of Homer--immortalized by Keats's sonnet-- are the most famous in the English language. Swinburne praised their "romantic and sometimes barbaric grandeur," their "freshness, strength, and inextinguishable fire." And the great critic George Saintsbury wrote, "For more than two centuries they were the resort of all who, unable to read Greek, wished to know what the Greek was. Chapman is far nearer Homer than any modern translator in any modern language."


This volume presents the original text of Chapman's translation of the Homeric hymns. The hymns, believed to have been written not by Homer himself but by followers who emulated his style, are poems written to the gods and goddesses of the ancient Greek pantheon. The collection, originally titled by Chapman "The Crowne of all Homers Workes," also includes epigrams and poems attributed to Homer and known as "The Lesser Homerica," as well as his famous "The Battle of Frogs and Mice."


 

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Contents

The Homeric Hymns and George Chapmans Translation
1
Editors Introduction
41
The Crowne of all Homers Workes
47
To the Earle of Somerset
49
The Occasion of this Imposd Crowne
54
AL THE HYMNES OF HOMER
55
An Hymne to Apollo
57
a Hymne to Hermes
83
To Pallas
149
To Vesta and Mercurie
150
To Earth the Mother of All
151
To the Sun
152
To the Moone
153
To Castor and Pollux
154
To Men of Hospitalitie
155
BATRACHOMYOMACHIA
157

A Hymne to Venus
114
To the Same
130
Bacchus or The Pyrats
132
To Mars
136
To Diana
137
To Pallas
138
To Ceres
139
To LyonHearted Hercules
140
To Castor and Pollux
141
To Pan
142
To Vulcan
144
To Phœbus
145
To Jove
146
To Bacchus
147
To Diana
148
CERTAINE EPIGRAMMS AND OTHER POEMS OF HOMER
175
To Cuma
177
Cuma Refusing His Offer tEternise Their State
178
An Assaie of His Begunne Iliads
179
To Neptune
180
The Pine
181
Against the Samian Ministresse or Nunne
182
Eiresione or The Olive Branch
184
To Certaine FisherBoyes Pleasing Him with Ingenious Riddles
185
Final Verses
186
Textual Notes
191
Commentary
205
Glossary
213
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Stephen Scully is associate professor of classical studies at Boston University.

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