Characteristicks of men, manners, opinions, times, Volume 1

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Page 365 - THIS BOOK. FORMS PART OF THE ORIGINAL LIBRARY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN BOUGHT IN EUROPE 1838 TO 1839 BY ASA CRAY a, >^ ^f-, LITERARY REMAINS OF TUB LATE WILLIAM HAZLITT.
Page 31 - For then it is we see wrath and fury and revenge and terrors in the Deity - when we are full of disturbances and fears within and have, by sufferance and anxiety, lost so much of the natural calm and easiness of our temper.
Page 117 - The true courage is cool and calm. The bravest of men have the least of a brutal bullying insolence; and in the very time of danger are found the most serene, pleasant, and free.
Page 292 - The passion of fear', as a modern philosopher informs me, 'determines the spirits to the muscles of the knees, which are instantly ready to perform their motion by taking up the legs with incomparable celerity in order to remove the body out of harm's way.
Page 171 - For so true a reverence has every one for himself when he comes clearly to appear before his close companion, that he had rather profess the vilest things of himself in open company than hear his character privately from his own mouth. So that we may readily...
Page 140 - For all beauty is truth."" True features make the beauty of a face and true proportions, the beauty of architecture as true measures, that of harmony and music.
Page 274 - ... single accident and calamity, naturally fitted to move horror and compassion. It may be properly said of this play, if I mistake not, that it has only one character or principal part. It contains no adoration or flattery of the...
Page 171 - and cry up folly before the world. But to appear fools, madmen, or varlets to ourselves, and prove it to our own faces that we are really such, is insupportable. For so true a reverence has every one for himself when he comes clearly to appear before his close companion, that he had rather profess the vilest things of himself in open company than hear his character privately...
Page 334 - One who aspires to the character of a man of breeding and politeness is careful to form his judgment of arts and sciences upon right models of perfection.
Page 207 - The moral artist who can thus imitate the Creator, and is thus knowing in the inward form and structure of his fellow-creature, will hardly, I presume, be found unknowing in himself, or at a loss in those numbers which make the harmony of a mind.

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