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J.R. Osgood, 1877 - 96 pages
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Page 50 - Literature is but a branch of religion, and always participates in its character : however, in our time, it is the only branch that still shows any greenness ; and, as some think, must one day become the main stem.
Page 11 - Of our Thinking, we might say, it is but the mere upper surface that we shape into articulate Thoughts ; — underneath the region of argument and conscious discourse, lies the region of meditation; here, in its quiet mysterious depths, dwells what vital force is in us ; here, if aught is to be created, and not merely manufactured and communicated, must the work go on. Manufacture is intelligible, but trivial ; Creation is great, and cannot be understood.
Page 82 - moonlight of memory,' other than sad and holy ?) sorrows not over its departure, as one utterly bereaved. The true Past departs not, nothing that was worthy in the Past departs; no Truth or Goodness realised by man ever dies, or can die ; but is all still here, and, recognised or not, lives and works through endless changes. If all things, to speak in the German dialect, are discerned by us, and exist for us, in an element...
Page 58 - ... of the mind to rise above the mind ; to environ and shut in, or as we say, comprehend the mind. Hopeless struggle, for the wisest, as for the foolishest ! What strength of sinew, or athletic skill, will enable the stoutest athlete to fold his own body in his arms, and, by lifting, lift up himself? The Irish Saint swam the Channel, " carrying his head in his teeth ; " but the feat has never been imitated.
Page 52 - ... might lead him a long journey now. Indeed, for our best class of readers, the chief pleasure, a very stinted one, is this same knowing of the Why; which many a Kames and Bossu has been, ineffectually enough, endeavouring to teach us: till at last these also have laid down their trade; and now your Reviewer is a mere taster; who tastes, and says, by the evidence of such palate, such tongue, as he has got, It is good, It is bad. Was it thus that the French carried...
Page 3 - THE healthy know not of their health, but only the sick : this is the Physician's Aphorism; and applicable in a far wider sense than he gives it. We may say, it holds no less in moral, intellectual, political, poetical, than in merely corporeal therapeutics ; that wherever, or in what shape soever, powers of the sort which can be named vital are at work, herein lies the test of their working right or working wrong. In the Body, for example, as all doctors are agreed, the first condition of complete...
Page 26 - Where two or three are gathered together," in the name of the Highest, then first does the Highest, as it is written, " appear among them to bless them ; " then first does an Altar and act of united Worship open a way from Earth to Heaven; whereon, were it but a simple Jacob'sladder, the heavenly Messengers will travel, with glad tidings and unspeakable gifts for men.
Page 86 - The fever of Scepticism must needs burn itself out, and burn out thereby the Impurities that caused it; then again will there be clearness, health. The principle of life, which now struggles painfully, in the outer, thin and barren domain of the Conscious or Mechanical, may then withdraw into its inner sanctuaries, its abysses of mystery and miracle; withdraw deeper than ever into that domain of the Unconscious, by nature infinite and inexhaustible; and creatively work there.
Page 48 - To begin with our highest Spiritual function, with Religion, we might ask, Whither has Religion now fled? Of Churches and their establishments we here say nothing ; nor of the unhappy domains of Unbelief, and how innumerable men, blinded in their minds...

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