Charity and the clergy: being a review by a Protestant clergyman of the "New Themes" controversy : together with sundry serious reflections upon the religious press, theological seminaries, ecclesiastical ambition, growth of moderatism, prostitution of the pulpit, and general decay of christianity

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Lippincott, Grambo & co., 1853 - Protestantism - 208 pages
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Page 136 - Christian should always remember that "he is not his own, but has been bought with a price, wherefore he should glorify God in his body and spirit, which are his." " That he is dead, and his life is hid with Christ in God.
Page 68 - Put off the old man with his deeds; and put on the new man, which is renewed in knowledge after the image of Him that created him
Page 63 - But what is the actual state of the Establishment? Myriads of its members have nothing of Christianity but the name, received in infancy by baptism, and retained without one spontaneous act of their own : and millions do nothing whatever to promote the cause of Christ. Its 13,000 Churches are generally without evangelistic activity, * Phil.
Page 63 - Its 13,000 churches are generally without evangelistic activity, without brotherly fellowship, without spirituality, without faith. Like Laodicea, they are lukewarm ; like Sardis, they have a name to live and are dead. Of its 16,000 ministers, about 1,568 do nothing ; about 6,681 limit their thoughts and labours to small parishes, which contain from 150 to 300 souls j while others in cities and towns profess to take charge of 8,000 or 9,000 souls.
Page 58 - ... fopperies of doctrine (still more dangerous as it seems to me). And yet there are these words resounding in their ears, ' Pure religion and undefiled is this, to visit the fatherless and widows in their affliction and to keep oneself unspotted from the world.
Page 145 - Churches and charity organizations believed that professionals should be facilitators of aid, not major or sole suppliers: "there must, of course, be officers, teachers, missionaries employed to live in the very midst of the wretchedness, and to supervise and direct all the efforts of the people . . . [but] mark you!
Page 64 - ... brotherly fellowship, without discipline, without spirituality, without faith. Of its 16,000 ministers, about 1,568 do nothing ; about 6,681 limit their thoughts and labors to small parishes which contain from 150 to 300 souls; while others in cities and towns profess to take charge of 8,000 or 9,000 souls. And of the 12,923 working pastors of churches, I fear, from various concurrent symptoms, that about 10,000 are unconverted men, who neither preach nor know the Gospel !" Part III.— Means...
Page 59 - ... yet are these words resounding in their ears, ' Pure religion and undefiled is this, to visit the fatherless and widows in their affliction, and to keep one'sself unspotted from the world.' " The Anglican ministry," (continues the N. British,) " are, for the most part, very cold and formal — much given to descant upon certain set themes in a hard, didactic manner, and never reaching the hearts of their congregations. * * * It would often seem as though the preacher had no other object than...
Page 208 - Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with thy might; for there is no work, nor device, nor knowledge, in the grave whither thou goest.
Page 67 - His heart was always in his work ; but more particularly did he now preach the word, in season and out of season ; ' reproving, rebuking, exhorting, with all longsuffering and doctrine.

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