Charles de Gaulle

Front Cover
Haus Publishing, 2003 - Biography & Autobiography - 170 pages
Charles de Gaulle, savior of France’s honor and founder of the Fifth Republic, was a deeply contradictory politician. A conservative and a Catholic, from a monarchist family, he restored democracy in 1944 and brought the Communists into his government. An imperialist in the 1940s, he oversaw France’s de–colonialization in the 1960s. A soldier, he spent much of his career opposing the army. Yet, it was precisely because of these contradictions that de Gaulle was able to reconcile so many of the conflicting strands in French politics and, for the first time since the Revolution, provide France with a universally accepted political system. Julian Jackson’s massive study, France: the Dark Years, was shortlisted for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize.
 

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Contents

Contents
5
Resistance 19401942
12
19431944
24
Government and Opposition 19441958
31
19461953
43
Inventing de Gaulle 19531958
51
Inventing Gaullism 19531958
60
Power 19581969
70
19581962
79
Pursuit of Grandeur
94
19581968
109
and After
122
Notes
144
Further Reading
160
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Professor Julian Jackson FBA, FRHistS is a leading historian of 20th-century France. He was educated at Cambridge University where he obtained his doctorate in 1982. After working for many years at the University of Wales, Swansea, he joined Queen Mary History Department in 2003. He has been on the editorial board of French Historical Studies and is at present on the editorial board of French History. He was elected a Fellow of the British Academy in 2003. In 2001 he published A large history of France under the Occupation, France: the Dark Years 1940-1944 (Oxford University Press: 2001) which aimed to offer the largest and most wide-ranging synthesis on the subject in any language. Jackson s most recent books include, The Fall of France (2003), which was one of the winners of the Wolfson History Prize for 2004. France: the Dark Years 1940-1944 and De Gaulle (2003) were translated into French.

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