Charlotte Hawkins Brown & Palmer Memorial Institute: What One Young African American Woman Could Do

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UNC Press Books, 1999 - Biography & Autobiography - 303 pages
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In the fall of 1901, Charlotte Hawkins Brown (1883-1961) jumped off a Southern Railway train in the unfamiliar backwoods of Guilford County, North Carolina. She was black, single, and barely eighteen years old and had come alone from Cambridge, Massachuse
 

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Contents

FROM NORTH CAROLINA TO NEW ENGLAND AND BACK
12
BETHANY INSTITUTE BECOMES PALMER MEMORIAL INSTITUTE
44
BROWNS HOPES AND DREAMS
60
A NEW RESPECTABILITY
74
FROM TRAGEDY TO TRIUMPH 19181922
90
THE NEW PALMER 19221927
116
THE AMA YEARS 19271934
132
INDEPENDENCE AND STABILITY 193419J2
156
IN BROWNS SHADOW 19J21971
190
EPILOGUE
209
CHRONOLOGY
217
SELECTED NEWSPAPER ARTICLES ON CHARLOTTE HAWKINS BROWN AND PALMER MEMORIAL INSTITUTE
221
NOTES
227
BIBLIOGRAPHY
269
INDEX
293
Copyright

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About the author (1999)

Charles W. Wadelington is associated with the Historic Sites Section of the North Carolina Department of Cultural Resourcesand is minority interpretations specialist.

Richard F. Knapp is associated with the Historic Sites Section of the North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources. and is curator of research.

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