Chasing the Runner's High: My Sixty Million-Step Program

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Y42K Publishing, Oct 12, 2010 - Sports & Recreation - 258 pages
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In "Chasing the Runner's High," Ray Charbonneau tells the story how he pushed his addiction to running up to, and then past, his limits. There are plenty of hard miles, but there's lots of fun along the way too as Ray shares what he learned, what he should have learned, and what he still has to learn from running. Marshall Ulrich, 4-time winner of the Badwater Ultramarathon and author of "Running on Empty," calls Chasing the Runner's High "a look at one man's life and obsession with running and addictive behaviors. Humorous at times, but always looking toward the greater good, Ray shares life's ups and downs and provides a hard look into the mind of a runner, offering advice that can only be had with experience and hard fought miles underfoot. Adena Schulzberg, winner of the 2006 Arkansas Marathon, writes, "these are brutally honest tales, told with candor and frankness about strength, courage, obsession, desire and hard won understanding of self and sport." It's a great read for runners or for non-runners who want to understand their running friends. www.y42k.com/books/chasingtherunnershigh.html
 

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I just finished reading Chasing the Runner's High and, as I am about to go into, enjoyed it immensely.
I have little use for runners writing about the ethos, spirituality or ontology of running
. Sheehan was great but to my mind said everything he had to say in about 30 pages, and the genre is more typified by the likes of the eminently ennoying Rachel Toor of Running Times ('I just ran a 10 K, finished 314th, thought about my kids during the 2nd and 3rd mile, and I feel great!') I mean, no knock on her as a person but Sheesh and Whatever, lady. Ergo, the fact that I liked yours as much as I did surprised me.
I believe without reservation that this is a book that deserves a far wider audience than it will probably get give the nature of modern of publishing and marketing and your (assuredly deliberate) failure to include formulae of the "Ten Steps to Your Best 5K in Only 8 weeks!" sort.
Your happily admitted OCD helps to make the book linear and logical and thereby fascinating, since your description of how you consider and go about things, and the results of it all, resonate as clearly as any first-person account I have ever read. You also capture, better than I have ever seen, an admixture of the reality, hard technical and physiological truths, and spirit of running at (and this is one of the things that makes it so good) any level--this is a book to be enjoyed by the veteran and the first timer in equal measure. I have read dozens if not scores of running books and this is easily the best non-technical book I have ever read. This is one that every runner should look up and read more than once--I am halfway into my second helping and and enjoying it as much if not more than the first time.
Plus, you are one funny bleeper, too!
 

Contents

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
5
CHAPTER 2
19
CHAPTER 3
43
CHAPTER 4
65
CHAPTER 5
79
CHAPTER 6
95
CHAPTER 7
117
CHAPTER 8
143
CHAPTER 9
165
CHAPTER 10
193
CHAPTER 11
221
APPENDIX 1
237
APPENDIX 2
247
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
255
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Ray Charbonneau lives in Arlington, Massachusetts with his wife Ruth and their two cats, Felix and Phoebe. Ray and Ruth can often be found running on the streets and trails of Arlington and the surrounding towns, but Felix and Phoebe stay inside. Ray's work has appeared in both national dead-tree publications and landfill-saving electronic formats. His articles on running have appeared in the Boston Globe, Ultrarunning, Marathon & Beyond, Level Renner, Cool Running and other publications. Find out more at y42k.com.

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