Chaucer

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Macmillan and Company, limited, 1907 - 207 pages
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Page 194 - I know not whether to marvel more, either that he in that misty time could see so clearly, or that we in this clear age walk so stumblingly after him.
Page 106 - DeemS thyself that deemest others' deed ; -And truth thee shall deliver, it is no dread. " That thee is sent receive in buxomness ; The wrestling of this world asketh a fall. Here is no home, here is but wilderness. Forth, pilgrime ! forth, beast, out of thy stall\ Look up on high, and thanke God of all.
Page 198 - CHAUCER. AN old man in a lodge within a park; The chamber walls depicted all around With portraitures of huntsman, hawk, and hound, And the hurt deer. He listeneth to the lark, Whose song comes with the sunshine through the dark Of painted glass in leaden lattice bound; He listeneth and he laugheth at the sound, Then writeth in a book like any clerk.
Page 67 - It is said to have been written at the request of Blanche, Duchess of Lancaster, as a prayer for her private use, " being a woman in her religion very devout.
Page 137 - But dwelt at home, and kepte' well his fold, So that the wolf ne made it not miscarry. He was a shepherd, and no mercenary. And though he holy were and virtuous, , He was to sinful men not despitous, 1 Great and small. 2 Layman. Ne of his speeche dangerous ne digne,' But in his teaching discreet and benign.
Page 124 - The which to me were hard now for to find. 0 goode God ! how gentle and how kind Ye seemed by your speech and your visage The day that maked was our marriage.
Page 198 - An old man in a lodge within a park; The chamber walls depicted all around With portraitures of huntsman, hawk, and hound, And the hurt deer. He listeneth to the lark, Whose song comes with the sunshine through the dark Of painted glass in leaden lattice bound; He listeneth and he laugheth at the sound, Then writeth in a book like any clerk. He is the poet of the dawn, who wrote The Canterbury Tales, and his old age Made beautiful with song; and as I read I hear the crowing cock, I hear the note...
Page 170 - Lidgate and Gower, his contemporaries: there is the rude sweetness of a Scotch tune in it, which is natural and pleasing, though not perfect.
Page 157 - Not oftentimes upriseth through the branches The probity of man ; and this He wills Who gives it, so that we may ask of Him.
Page 26 - For trusteth well that your estate royal, Nor vain delight, nor only worthiness Of you in war or tourney martial, Nor pomp, array, nobley...

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