Chemistry in Daily Life

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H. Grevel & Company, 1909 - Chemistry - 304 pages
 

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Page 278 - ... metal poured into ingots, after having been thoroughly rabbled with a plumbago stirrer, a homogeneous alloy resulted; test-pieces cut from different ingots all assayed alike, within a minute fraction — not more than one or two ten-thousandths variation above or below the standard. When, however, an alloy of 900 parts of silver and 100 parts of copper was poured into ingots, after having been thoroughly mixed, considerable irregularity was found to exist in the distribution of silver in different...
Page 123 - In cellulose the carbon, hydrogen and oxygen are united in the proportions of six atoms of carbon, ten atoms of hydrogen, and five atoms of oxygen...
Page 18 - For this reason it is extensively employed in the ultimate analysis of organic substances, of which it converts the carbon into carbonic acid, and the hydrogen into water. The...
Page 65 - The liquid is drawn off, the deposited starch is drained, and finally dried at a temperature which must not be too high, as if moist starch is heated to about 50 or 60 C. [120 to 140 F.] it is completely changed, its structure disappears, and it becomes what we call paste. Starch is spoken of as potato-starch, wheat-starch, etc., according to the name of the plant from which it has been obtained. Starches which come from foreign countries are generally called by special names, such as arrowroot,...
Page 79 - We cover some minced beef wfth cold water and shake thoroughly—the beef is minced so that a large surface may be exposed to the action of the water.
Page ix - Professor of Chemistry in the University of Konigsberg, to a society in that town modeled after the celebrated Humboldt Academy of Berlin.
Page 161 - ... stones, pieces of wood, or skins; but the Egyptians very long ago discovered how to prepare paper from the papyrus plant. The stalks of that plant were cut into as thin and wide leaflets as possible, and these were placed side by side ; a second layer of similar pieces was arranged transversely over the first, and the whole was placed under a press, where it dried together to a single sheet. This was then rubbed as smooth as possible and was ready for writing on. Besides this writing material,...
Page ix - These lectures, and the publication of them in book form, caused quite a stir in German circles, and will no doubt prove equally interesting, instructive, and suggestive to English readers. The method of treatment is eminently human and suggestive. The author shows that chemical phenomena are intimately bound up with our daily lives, and that whether we are conscious of it or not we are constantly...
Page x - ... sort. This book shows that the chemist is in a sense both of these, and much more than both ; it causes the careful reader to realise the permeating nature of chemical knowledge, and it teaches him that chemistry is emphatically the most human, and for * that reason the most fascinating, of the sciences. The book can be followed intelligently by any reader who gives it a little care ; no special technical knowledge is required. The translation has been made from a copy of the original book kindly...
Page 177 - ... products of the reaction of these two compounds are nitric acid and sulphate of soda ; the acid sulphate of soda is generally produced for reasons which to consider here would lead us too far afield. Sulphuric acid used to be prepared in the manner indicated above from sulphur; but in the year 1838 the price of sulphur rose from 5 los. to 15 per ton, because in that year the then King of Naples leased to a Marseilles firm a monopoly for making sulphur in Sicily, which is the only European...

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