Cherokee Clans: An Informal History

Front Cover
Panther's Lodge Publishers, Apr 4, 2013 - History - 52 pages
0 Reviews
This unique book introduces the reader to the seven Cherokee clans, found in no other American Indian tribe. They are Wolf (Ani-Wahiya), Bird (Ani-Tsiskwa), Deer (Ani-Kawi), Twister (Ani-Gilohi), Wild Potato (Ani-Gotegewi), Panther (Ani-Sahoni) and Paint (Ani-Wodi). In each section of notes appear the etymology of the Cherokee name, synonyms and related clans, the clan's in-born strengths and character, mitochondrial DNA types, symbols and iconography, famous people, ceremonies, art and monuments. Illustrated and solidly documented, this down-to-earth guide is the first and last word on an ancient matriarchal kinship system that began in the dawn of human history and lives on in contemporary times.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
2
Section 2
29
Section 3
40
Section 4
41

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2013)

Donald N. Yates (also published as Donald Panther-Yates) was born in 1950 in Cedartown, Georgia and is of one-quarter American Indian descent. His first book was The Bear Went over the Mountain, a genealogy and social history of the Yates family of Virginia. Around 2000 he found out his parents and ancestors belonged to the Melungeons, an Appalachian ethnic group. With Elizabeth Caldwell Hirschman he has co-authored When Scotland Was Jewish (2007), Jews and Muslims in British Colonial America: A Genealogical History (2012) and The Early Jews and Muslims of England and Wales: A Genetic and Genealogical History (2013). He is the author of Old World Roots of the Cherokee: How DNA, Ancient Alphabets and Religion Explain the Origins of America's Largest Indian Nation (2012) and Old Souls in a New World (2013). He also publishes a series called Cherokee Chapbooks aimed at making essential texts and traditional American Indian storytelling accessible to those rediscovering their Native roots. 

Bibliographic information