Chicano Rap: Gender and Violence in the Postindustrial Barrio

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University of Texas Press, Sep 21, 2012 - Music - 216 pages
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Powered by a driving beat, clever lyrics, and assertive attitudes, rap music and hip hop culture have engrossed American youth since the mid-1980s. Although the first rappers were African Americans, rap and hip hop culture quickly spread to other ethnic groups who have added their own cultural elements to the music. Chicano Rap offers the first in-depth look at how Chicano/a youth have adopted and adapted rap music and hip hop culture to express their views on gender and violence, as well as on how Chicano/a youth fit into a globalizing world.

Pancho McFarland examines over five hundred songs and seventy rap artists from all the major Chicano rap regions—San Diego, San Francisco and Northern California, Texas, and Chicago and the Midwest. He discusses the cultural, political, historical, and economic contexts in which Chicano rap has emerged and how these have shaped the violence and misogyny often expressed in Chicano rap and hip hop. In particular, he argues that the misogyny and violence of Chicano rap are direct outcomes of the "patriarchal dominance paradigm" that governs human relations in the United States. McFarland also explains how globalization, economic restructuring, and the conservative shift in national politics have affected Chicano/a youth and Chicano rap. He concludes with a look at how Xicana feminists, some Chicano rappers, and other cultural workers are striving to reach Chicano/a youth with a democratic, peaceful, empowering, and liberating message.

 

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Contents

A HIPHOP PROJECT
1
Photo Section
13
The Patriarchal Dominance Paradigm in the Postindustrial Barrio
14
A Guide to Artists and Genres
35
The Gendered Image
62
JV Versus Ms Sancha
79
Mirror of a Belligerent Society
94
Chapter Six THE CHICANO RAP ON GLOBALIZATION
115
Chapter Seven CONFRONTING DOMINANCE AND CONSTRUCTING RELATIONSHIPS WITH YOUTH
133
NOTES
151
REFERENCES
169
INDEX
189
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

PANCHO MCFARLAND is Assistant Professor of Sociology at Chicago State University.

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