Child Care: States Increased Spending on Low-Income Families

Front Cover
DIANE Publishing, Jun 1, 2001 - 51 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 45 - Maryland Massachusetts . Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire. New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio.-. Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode lsland South Carolina South Dakota..
Page 8 - ... in fiscal year 1998 to about $3.7 billion in fiscal year 2002. Each state's yearly federal allocation consists of separate discretionary, mandatory, and matching funds.5 A state does not have to obligate or spend any state funds to receive CCDF discretionary and mandatory funds. However, to receive matching funds — and, thus, its full CCDF allocation — a state must maintain its expenditure of state funds for child care programs at specified previous levels and spend additional state funds...
Page 9 - Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC), established by the Social Security Act of 1935.
Page 11 - The federal government provides a fixed amount of funds regardless of any changes in state spending or the number of people the programs serve.
Page 10 - Instead of prescribing in detail how programs are to be structured, the new law authorizes states to use their block grants in any manner reasonably calculated to accomplish the purposes of TANF. For example, states are allowed to set their own criteria for defining who will be eligible and what assistance and services will be available.
Page 21 - It found that, while states' funding policies favor TANF families over non-TANF families for receiving child care subsidies, children of non-TANF families represented the largest percentage of children receiving child care subsidies in most of the states that were examined.
Page 20 - CCDF plans for fiscal years 2000 through 2001, more than half the states list TANF and TANF-transitional families either first or second on their priority list of families who are eligible for receiving child care subsidies.
Page 18 - L Giannarelli and J. Barsimantov, Child Care Expenses of America's Families (Washington, DC: The Urban Institute, Dec.
Page 7 - ... available in 1996 under previous law. In the future, the amount of federal CCDF funds available could rise from about $3.1 billion in fiscal year 1998 to about $3.7 billion in fiscal year 2002. Each state's yearly federal allocation consists of separate discretionary, mandatory, and matching funds.5 A state does not have to obligate or spend any state funds to receive CCDF discretionary and mandatory funds. However, to receive matching funds — and, thus, its full CCDF allocation — a state...
Page 9 - ... $200 million per year for 5 years for bonuses to reward states with high performance in achieving the goals of TANF.

Bibliographic information