Child-Centered Play Therapy: A Practical Guide to Developing Therapeutic Relationships with Children

Front Cover
John Wiley & Sons, Aug 20, 2010 - Psychology - 464 pages
0 Reviews
"The authors . . . make child-centered play therapy readily understandable to those who wish to take advantage of its long history of helping children overcome problems and grow emotionally to a level of maturity difficult to achieve by any other approach."
From the Foreword, by Louise F. Guerney, PhD, RPT-S

A comprehensive resource that thoroughly teaches the theory, methods, and practice of child-centered play therapy

Child-Centered Play Therapy: A Practical Guide to Developing Therapeutic Relationships with Children offers how-to direction and practical advice for conducting child-centered play therapy. Filled with case studies, learning activities, and classroom exercises, this book presents extensive coverage of play therapy applications such as setting goals and treatment planning, as well as recommendations for family and systemic services that can be provided along with play therapy.

This rich resource provides:

  • A thorough introduction to the theory and guiding principles underlying child-centered play therapy

  • Skill guidance including structuring sessions, tracking, empathy, responding to children's questions, and role-play

  • Effective ways of determining what limits to set in the playroom and how to set them in a therapeutically effective manner

  • Clear methods for monitoring children's progress through stages as well as external measures of progress

  • Practical guidance in adjunct therapist tasks such as playroom set-up, documentation, ending therapy, and working with parents, teachers, and principals

Endorsed by Louise Guerney—a founding child-centered play therapy figure who developed the skills-based methods covered in this book—Child-Centered Play Therapy comprehensively and realistically introduces practitioners to the child-centered approach to play therapy and addresses how to incorporate the approach into schools, agencies, or private practice.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Chapter Overview and Summary
Primary Skill Objectives
Introductory Remarks
WarmUp
Illustrations of Normal Variety in the WarmUp Stage
The Aggressive Stage
Illustrations of Variety in the Aggressive Stage
The Regressive Stage

Mechanisms of Change in CCPT
Can the Process Really Be ChildCentered? Does a Child Really Know the Way?
Research Supporting CCPT
The Background of CCPT in Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy and Links to Varied Theories
Who We Are
And Who Are You?
Frequently Asked Questions
Notes on Terms Used
Activities to Solidify Study So Far and Prepare for Ongoing Learning
Application Focus Issue 1
Primary Skill Objectives
Introduction and Chapter Overview
What Gets in the Way of Simply Teaching New Ways of Being but Also Empowers CCPT for Childrens Change?
Elements of Child and Human Development That Empower CCPT
Why Play?
The Family of Counseling Theories
You Can Change the Child Even When You Cant Change the System
Activities for Further Study
Application Focus Issue and Overview
Chapter Overview and Summary
The Core Conditions and the Being of the ChildCentered Play Therapist
Considering the Ideal Qualities in Action
From Ideal Qualities to Virginia Axlines Eight Principles of Play Therapy
Concluding Comments
Activities for Further Learning
Application Focus Issue and Overview
Primary Skill Objectives
Considering the Eight Principles in Action
From Principles to Skills
Concluding Comments
Activities and Resources for Further Study
Application Focus Issue
Chapter Overview and Summary
Play Materials Commonly Used in ChildCentered Play Therapy
Criteria for Toy Selection in CCPTWhat to Include or Exclude and Why
Ideal Criteria for the Space and Environment of the Playroom
The Traveling Play Therapist
What to Do and Not to Do to Accommodate Older Children in the Playroom
Suggestions for Setting Up Your Playroom on a Shoestring Budget
Common Problems in Preparing Play Space and Choosing Materials
Further Suggestions as You Begin to Collect Playroom Toys and Supplies
Remember That Youre the Best Toy in the Playroom
Concluding Thoughts
Questions for Discussion and Review
Application Focus Issue
Chapter Overview and Summary
Primary Skill Objectives
The Therapeutic Purpose of the Tracking and Empathic Responding Skills
Making Skillful Tracking Responses
Foundational Skill Foundational Attitude
Making Skillful Empathic Responses
Special Situations Requiring the Use of the Tracking and Empathic Responding
Concluding Thoughts
Activities and Resources for Further Study
Application Focus Issue
Chapter Overview and Summary
Primary Skill Objectives
The Value of Structuring and Limits to Enhance Autonomy and SelfRegulation
Structuring Begins With the Simple Opening Message to the Child
Established Parameters of the Playroom and Structuring Statement Skills
Structuring Around Time Limits and Delivering the Departing Message
Maintaining Therapist Congruence While Balancing Necessary Structuring and Limit Setting With Permissiveness or the Freedom to Be
Allowing the Child to Come Up With Alternative Behaviors vs Targeting Alternative Behaviors for the Child
Limit Setting and Structuring Applied
Structuring Around the Ending Phase of CCPT
When a Child Reacts Strongly to the Ending Phase of CCPT
Arbitrary Endings
Working With Parents and Teachers During the Ending Phase of CCPT
Opportunities for Practice Study Skill Development and SelfSupervision
Application Focus Issue
Chapter Overview and Summary
Primary Skill Objectives
A Therapeutic Opportunity
General Guidelines for Responding to Childrens Questions in the Playroom
Common Misconceptions and Mistakes Made by Beginning Play Therapists
Models of Responses to Common Informational and Structuring Questions
Responding to Childrens Requests and Commands
Concluding Remarks Regarding Requests and Commands
Activities and Resources for Further Study
Application Focus Issue
Chapter Overview and Summary
Primary Skill Objectives
Being a Confident Companion to the Child in Therapy
The Value Inherent in Pretend Play
Skills for Participating in Interactive and Solitary RolePlay Scenarios
Themes in Roles Assigned During CCPT RolePlay
Common Problems Regarding Engaging in RolePlay
Taped Supervision to Enhance and Develop the Necessary RolePlay Skills of a Confident Companion
Concluding Thoughts
Application Focus Scenarios
Illustrations of Variety in the Regressive Stage
The Mastery Stage
Illustrations of the Mastery Stage
Transitional Stages
Illustrations of Transition Sessions
Atypical Responses of Children to the Play Therapy Process
Examples of Types of Child Clients Who Have Unusual Struggles in WarmUp and Potential Variations in Therapeutic Procedures
Concluding Thoughts
Activities for Practice and Review on Stages of CCPT
Application Focus Issues
Chapter Overview and Summary
Primary Skill Objectives
What Every Parent Should Know in Getting Started With CCPT
Getting Started in an Agency or Private Practice Setting
An Example of Getting Started in an Agency Setting
Getting Started With a Parent in a School Setting
Example of Getting Started With a Parent in a School Setting
Feedback Sessions With Parents
Working From a Teacher or Principal Referral
Getting Started With Teachers
Considering a SchoolBased Array of Services for Child Problems That Employs Effective Use of CCPT
Feedback Meetings With Principals and Teachers
Common Problems in Helping Parents Teachers and Principals Support the Childs Work in Play Therapy
Setting Goals Evaluating Progress and Explaining Counseling
Activities and Resources for Further Study
Application Focus Activity
Primary Skill Objectives
Introduction
Wise and Poor Goals
Measurable Objectives
Steps to Setting Goals
The Question of Predicting Duration
The Course of Progress and Examples of Progress Charting
Case Notes
Common Problems
Concluding Thoughts
For Further Learning
Application Focus Scenario 1
Application Focus Scenario 2
Primary Skill Objectives
The Historical Roots of Filial Therapy
Goals and Outcomes of Filial Therapy
Filial Therapy Formats
Outcome Research on Filial Therapy
For What Parents and What Children Is FT Appropriate?
The Filial Therapy Process
Concluding Thoughts
Activities and Resources for Further Study
Application Focus Scenario 1
Application Focus Scenario 2
Chapter Overview
Primary Skill Objectives
Multifaceted Multisystemic Interventions to Follow or Accompany CCPT in School Settings
Multifaceted Multisystemic Interventions to Follow or Accompany CCPT in Agency Settings
Finding Additional Resources for the Children You Serve in the Community
Application Focus Scenarios
Chapter Summary and Overview
Primary Skill Objectives
Avoiding the Pitfalls of Cultural Assumptions and Ethnocentricity
Common Problems of Beginning Counselors in Providing CCPT across Cultures and in Unfamiliar Territory
Return to Scenarios From Opening of Chapter
Activities for Further Study
Application Focus Issues
Chapter Overview and Summary
The Importance of Ethical Principles and Legal Guidelines
Specific Values of the ChildCentered Play Therapy Method
Informed Consent
Respecting the Confidentiality Rights of the Parent and the Privacy of the Child
Mandated Reporting of Suspected Child Abuse and Neglect
Ethical Issues Regarding Case Notes and Record Maintenance
Becoming a Competent ChildCentered Play Therapist
Summary
Activities for Further Study
Application Focus Issue 1
Primary Skill Objectives
Mastering CCPT Skills and Developing Confidence and Satisfaction in the Work
Developing Your WrapAround Skills
SelfCare From the ChildCentered Perspective
Our Alphabet Soup of Favorite Supportive Organizations
Activity for Further Study and Development
Skills Support Resource A
Skills Support Resource B
Skills Support Resource C
Skills Support Resource D
Skills Support Resource E
Skills Support Resource F
Skills Support Resource G
Skills Support Resource H
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2010)

NANCY H. COCHRAN, MA, CAS, LMHC, has over twenty years of experience serving children, youth, and families in school and agency settings as a child-centered play therapist and school psychologist. She is certified as a Child-Centered Play Therapy Supervisor by the National Institute for Relationship Enhancement and teaches child-centered play therapy at the University of Tennessee.

WILLIAM J. NORDLING, PhD, LP, RPT-S, is an Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of Psychology at the Institute for the Psychological Sciences in Arlington, Virginia, where he teaches and supervises child-centered play therapy. He was the 2010 President of the Association for Play Therapy.

JEFF L. COCHRAN, PhD, NCC, LMHC, is an Associate Professor at the University of Tennessee where he teaches, researches, and supervises child-centered play therapy, and serves as Coordinator of the Mental Health Counseling Program.

Bibliographic information