Child Parent Relationship Therapy (CPRT): A 10-Session Filial Therapy Model

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Taylor & Francis, Nov 18, 2005 - Psychology - 512 pages
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This book offers a survey of the historical and theoretical development of the filial therapy approach and presents an overview of filial therapy training and then filial therapy processes. The book also includes a transcript of an actual session, answers to common questions raised by parents, children, and therapists, as well as additional resources and research summaries. Additional chapters address filial therapy with special populations, filial therapy in special settings, and perhaps the most useful resource for busy therapists and parents, a chapter covers variations of the 10 session model, to allow for work with individual parents, training via telephone, and time-intensive or time-extended schedules.
 

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Contents

2 Unique Features of CPRT
15
3 Training and Supervision of CPRT Filial Therapists
31
4 Critical Components in Facilitating the Process of CPRT
47
5 CPRT Skills Concepts and Attitudes To Be Taught
77
6 The 10Session CPRT Training Process
109
Training Objectives and Reflective Responding
127
Basic Principles for Play Sessions
165
ParentChild Play Session Skills and Procedures
199
Supervision and SelfEsteemBuilding Responses
295
Supervision and Encouragement vs Praise
317
Supervision and Generalizing Skills
335
Evaluation and Summing Up
351
A OneWeek 4Year and 13Year FollowUp
375
18 Questions Parents and Children Ask and Problems and Solutions in CPRT Training
397
Learning About My Child and Myself
423
20 Variations of the 10Session CPRT Model
441

Supervision Format and Limit Setting
221
Play Session Skills Review
247
Supervision and Choice Giving
269
A 10Session Filial Therapy Model
457
Index
483
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About the author (2005)

Garry L. Landreth, Ed.D., LPC, RPT-S, is a Regents Professor in the Department of Counseling, Development and Higher Education at the University of North Texas. He is the founder and director of the Center for Play Therapy, the largest play therapy training program in the world.
Sue Bratton, Ph.D., LPC, RPT-S is an associate professor in Counseling and Director of the Center for Play Therapy at the University of North Texas and the former clinical director in the Counseling Program at UNT.

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